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When I try and read a gzip file in to Ruby 1.8.7 line-by-line, it only reads the first line of the gzipped file. This does not happen on my testing machine, only on my production server.

It may have something to do with zlib or Gzipreader but I am currently at a loss on what to do next and any suggestions would be fantastic.

require 'zlib'
require 'open-uri'

list = Array.new
file = Dir.glob("*").max_by {|f| File.mtime(f)}


File.open(file) do |f|
  gz = Zlib::GzipReader.new(f)
  #something right here is causing an issue on production system
  list = gz.read
  gz.close
end

#I need to take the array and push it to redis
list = list.split("\n")
list.shift
list.each do |list|
    puts list
    puts "\n\n"
end
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1  
Rather than do it inside Ruby completely, you could use zcat and pipe it into Ruby. Inside Ruby use ARGF to read the lines from STDIN and process them. Try zcat path_to_a_gz_file | ruby -e 'p ARGF.read'. Ruby will get all the lines passed in, where you can massage them or pass them to redis. –  the Tin Man Oct 24 '13 at 23:01
    
Ohh really thats a nice trick, Ill try that tomorrow and push that in to a string array if I do not see any other solutions. Thank you. –  Cole Shores Oct 25 '13 at 1:40
    
Im having trouble reading that back in as a string, any advice? –  Cole Shores Oct 25 '13 at 3:42
    
Is there a way to read back the string using string_name = system "zcat", file. In this way it shows it through stdout however doesn't feed back the input to the string. That way I can keep it self contained. I am open to your suggestion as well, Im just not familiar with STDIN within ruby –  Cole Shores Oct 25 '13 at 3:58
    
i need to undo that –  Cole Shores Oct 25 '13 at 15:29

3 Answers 3

First, you might want to use '*.gz' instead of '*', in case there are other files in the script's working directory.

Here are a couple of solutions:

Using GzipReader (recommended)

require 'zlib'

file = Dir.glob('*').max_by { |f| File.mtime(f) }
fd = File.open(file)
gz = Zlib::GzipReader(fd)

gz.readlines[1..-1].each do |line|
  line.chomp!
  puts line, "\n\n"
end

Using IO#popen and zcat

You should not pass unsanitized user input to Kernel#exec or similar functions, as it could be used to execute arbitrary commands.

In your case, you're not dealing with user input. Therefore, one would need write access to the script's working directory to do that. However, it's still bad practice—a filename containing special shell characters (', ", "$", etc.) could cause unexpected issues.

The following solution should be as safe as the GzipReader one, but it's usually good practice to use the standard library instead of relying on external programs.

file = Dir.glob('*').max_by { |f| File.mtime(f) }

IO.popen(['zcat', file]).readlines[1..-1].each do |line|
  line.chomp!
  puts line, "\n\n"
end
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I will implement your suggestion however my script expects a .gz file and sends it to zcat off of that. Will it still take control and run havoc otherwise? –  Cole Shores Nov 7 '13 at 1:27
    
@ColeShores I've updated my answer, please check it again. –  nyuszika7h Nov 30 '13 at 15:13

Here's how to write that in a more Ruby-like way:

require 'open-uri'

file = Dir.glob("*").max_by { |f| File.mtime(f) }
`zcat #{file}`.split("\n")[1..-1].each do |list|
  puts list, "\n\n"
end

Here's what it does:

  • It opens a subshell using backticks, sending a command to zcat with the parameter of the name of the file.
  • The resulting output string captured from the output is split on line-ends.
  • The resulting array is looped-over using each, after slicing the array to skip the first element.
  • Each line is passed into the block as list.

What's wrong with the original code? Besides being done in a non-Ruby-like way?

  • Don't initialize an array using Array.new. This isn't Java, so use [] unless you need some of the darker Array initialization magic.
  • Everything beyond that point is very much a target for DRYing (Don't Repeat Yourself).
  • Your variable names are largely undescriptive; Use names that are useful.
  • Don't assign to a variable and use it once unless it's one nasty assignment that would complicate or result in confusing code later.
  • You use list multiple times and in multiple ways. That's a terrible idea, especially when you move from non-trivial apps to large ones. Don't create "slush" variables, create usefully named ones. And, especially, don't stomp on them as you work your way through the logic.
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I took your advice on a few things here even though my script is working with error checking. I use Array.new since I am looping through incoming .gz files from a CDN and I figure that would kill the current array and start a new one for a infinite looping process, do you know if [] will do that without memory issues? I will also take in your advice about changing it from list. That was mostly a placeholder anyways until I could wrap my head around pushing it in to a single array and then splitting it in by the "\n" delimiter. Thank you again for your suggestions I really appreciate it. –  Cole Shores Oct 26 '13 at 0:31
    
Array.new and [] are going to do the same thing, both return a new array. –  the Tin Man Oct 27 '13 at 0:10
    
I took your advice on using [] for the array initialization and then just did list.clear(or really log_input.clear since I took your advice and changed the string array name to something more logical). after the data had been parsed and sent to redis then to reloop back over to check again for new files that have been FTP'd from the CDN. My mistake here was that I kept initiating new arrays rather than simply clearing out what I already had within my in infinite loop. –  Cole Shores Oct 28 '13 at 2:22
    
You over-complicate it. Don't bother clearing the list, simply assign a new empty array and be done with it. Ruby will garbage collect the old one. –  the Tin Man Oct 28 '13 at 13:44

I figured out the solution based on the suggestion below. I went ahead and fed the system zcat + the newest file, fed that back in to a string called output. Took the string output and put it in to an array called list to be split up by each new line. This is obviously for logstashing purposes. Thanks again.

require 'open-uri'
require 'open3'

list = Array.new

file = Dir.glob("*").max_by {|f| File.mtime(f)}
unzip = "zcat " + file
output = `#{unzip}`
list = output



#I need to take the array and push it to redis
list = list.split("\n")
list.shift
list.each do |list|
    puts list
    puts "\n\n"
end
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