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a = 1
inPut = input("Please enter a file name: ")
infile = open(inPut, "r")

line = infile.readline()
print("/*", a ,"*/", line)
while line !="" :
    a = a + 1
    line = infile.readline()
    print("/*",a,"/*", line)

infile.close()

So i've been working on this code to print out lines of text out of another file. I simply did a file with 4 lines of text, and created a print statement before the listed line to indicate which line it is. How could i alter my code so that it doesn't print a 5th line indicator when there is no text?

This is how it is printed:

/* 1 */ Hello
/* 2 */ My name 
/* 3 */ is 
/* 4 */ John
/* 5 */

I would like it to be printed as:

/* 1 */ Hello
/* 2 */ My name 
/* 3 */ is 
/* 4 */ John
share|improve this question
for a, line in enumerate(infile, 1):
    print("/*", a, "*/", line)
share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't that print /* 0 */ Hello? – aIKid Oct 25 '13 at 0:12
    
The second argument to enumerate() is optional and it is the starting index which defaults to 0, I use 1 here. – Andrew Clark Oct 25 '13 at 16:08

In my opinion, your problem is more suited to using a for loop than a while loop. Something like this:

input_filename = input("Please enter a file name: ")
with open(input_filename) as infile:
    for (line_number, line) in enumerate(infile, 1):
        if line:
            print("/*",a,"/*", line)

Improvements to note:

  • The file handle itself is an iterator, so you don't need to use readlines or similar method, you can iterate it directly.
  • Use of the with statement to correctly open and close the file handle
  • Use of enumerate to get the line numbers (replaces your counter variable)
  • More descriptive variable names
  • The conditional if line works on the fact that an empty string is false, non-empty string is true.
share|improve this answer

You can break out of your loop after you read the input.

while True:
    a = a + 1
    line = infile.readline()
    if line == "":
        break
    print("/*",a,"/*", line)
share|improve this answer
    
could you explain to me how the break statement works? I haven't go to that terminology yet. Thanks! – John Oct 25 '13 at 0:02
1  
It simply terminates the loop. Just gets out of it as soon as you get to 'break' for the first time and goes to whatever is after the loop. – sashkello Oct 25 '13 at 0:03
    
@F.J's answer is better though in terms of the general approach you should take. – sashkello Oct 25 '13 at 0:04

You can use a for loop, combined with the readlines() function of the open file-like object. Also, you should probably use enumerate to enumerate over the lines you've read, like this:

inPut = input("Please enter a file name: ")
infile = open(inPut, "r")

for index, line in enumerate(infile.readlines()):
    print("/*", index, "/*", line)

infile.close()

In this example, I changed the name of your variable "a" to the name "index".

Another tip would be to use the with statement (new in Python 2.5) to automagically close the file handle when you're done with it:

inPut = input("Please enter a file name: ")
with open(inPut, "r") as infile:
    for index, line in enumerate(infile.readlines()):
        print("/*", index, "/*", line)
share|improve this answer
    
No need to call .readlines() at all; file objects are iterables. – Martijn Pieters Oct 25 '13 at 0:06

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