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I have this class:

public class Fibonacci
{
    public static int Calculate( int x )
    {
        if (x <= 0)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        else
        {
            return Calculate(x - 1) + Calculate(x - 2);
        }
    }
}

Per a tutorial I'm doing if one inputs 6 one should get 8 as an expected result, but when I run it, it always returns 0. It's recursive so it makes sense to me, but how do they get 8 as an expected result?

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9  
You should work that out by yourself, you will learn more. Hint: think what Calculate(0) does and what Calculate(1) does. And if you don't get it, use a debugger. –  Doc Brown Dec 24 '09 at 11:17
    
The Calculate method can't possibly be returning null - the return type is an integer, which cannot be null. I notice that in the text you say it returns zero - but in the title you say null. These are not the same thing - I suggest you update the title to say zero. –  Rob Levine Dec 24 '09 at 11:18
    
As a sidenote: recursion is not the best way to calculate fibonacci numbers. For instance when you use this way to calculate f(n), then f(n-2) is calculated twice. F(n-4) is calculated 5 times! Try it out on paper with f(6) ... –  Hans Kesting Dec 24 '09 at 12:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The fibonacci sequence has 2 stopping points, and they're both 1 (1,1,2,3,5,...). This works:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Fibonacci
{
    public static int Calculate( int x )
    {
        if (x <= 1)
            return 1;
        else
            return Calculate(x - 1) + Calculate(x - 2);
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
     Console.WriteLine(Calculate(4));
    }
}
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this still doesn't produce 8 when input is 6... –  Tony The Lion Dec 24 '09 at 11:30
    
It's 0 based, so if you give it 5, it'll give back 8. –  Blindy Dec 24 '09 at 11:48

What's 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + ... + 0?

There's your answer.

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You exit condition is wrong. Read through your code and think it through for inputs 1 and 2.

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Either the tutorial is wrong or you copied the code incorrectly. You are correct that it what you have above will always return 0. Check your base cases.

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Abductio ad absurdum - Calculate(x) never actually returns a non-zero number. 8 is the sixth Fib number, but you're never creating a non-zero value from this function. As @Blindy points out, you need a more extensive and inclusive base case.

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