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I heard that transposing matrix before multiplication will greatly speed up the operation because of cache locality. So I wrote a simple C++ program to test it with row-major ordering (compilation requires C++11 and boost).

The results are astonishing: 7.43 seconds vs 0.94 seconds. But I don't understand why it speeds up. Indeed in the second version (transposing first), multiplication code accesses the data through stride-1 pattern and has much better locality than the first one. However, to transpose the matrix B, one has to acess the data non-sequentially too and results in a lot of cache misses as well. The overhead of allocating memory and copying data should be non-neglible as well. So why does the second version speeds up the code so much?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/timer/timer.hpp>
#include <random>

std::vector<int> random_ints(size_t size)
{
    std::vector<int> result;
    result.reserve(size);
    std::random_device rd;
    std::mt19937 engine(rd());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<int> dist(0, 100);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < size; ++i)
        result.push_back(dist(engine));
    return result;
}

// matrix A: m x n; matrix B: n x p; matrix C: m x n;
std::vector<int> matrix_multiply1(const std::vector<int>& A, const std::vector<int>& B, size_t m, size_t n, size_t p)
{
    boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;
    std::vector<int> C(m * p);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < m; ++i)
    {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < p; ++j)
        {
            for (size_t k = 0; k < n; ++k)
            {
                C[i * m + j] += A[i * m + k] * B[k * n + j];
                // B is accessed non-sequentially
            }
        }
    }
    return C;
}

// matrix A: m x n; matrix B: n x p; matrix C: m x n;
std::vector<int> matrix_multiply2(const std::vector<int>& A, const std::vector<int>& B, size_t m, size_t n, size_t p)
{
    boost::timer::auto_cpu_timer t;
    std::vector<int> C(m * p), B_transpose(n * p);

    // transposing B
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < p; ++j)
        {
            B_transpose[i + j * p] = B[i * n + j];
            // B_transpose is accessed non-sequentially
        }
    }

    // multiplication
    for (size_t i = 0; i < m; ++i)
    {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < p; ++j)
        {
            for (size_t k = 0; k < n; ++k)
            {
                C[i * m + j] += A[i * m + k] * B_transpose[k + j * p];
                // all sequential access
            }
        }
    }
    return C;
}

int main()
{
    const size_t size = 1 << 10;
    auto A = random_ints(size * size);
    auto C = matrix_multiply1(A, A, size, size, size);
    std::cout << C.front() << ' ' << C.back() << std::endl; // output part of the result
    C = matrix_multiply2(A, A, size, size, size);
    std::cout << C.front() << ' ' << C.back() << std::endl; // compare with output of algorithm 1
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
I would suggest modifying the code to try each algorithm in alternation and repeat three or four times. Otherwise, the speedup may be due to cache warming, branch prediction, or other factors that have to do with how you tested rather than code optimizations. –  David Schwartz Oct 25 '13 at 3:14
    
@DavidSchwartz: I tried your suggestion. It makes no difference. –  Siyuan Ren Oct 25 '13 at 3:36
    
Try timing the transpose and the multiply separately. That might tell you a lot more. –  Mysticial Oct 25 '13 at 3:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The multiplication involves many more accesses than the transpose, so it dominates execution time.

You can see this quite clearly just by looking at the for loop headers:

// transpose
for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    for (size_t j = 0; j < p; ++j)
        ...

// multiplication
for (size_t i = 0; i < m; ++i)
    for (size_t j = 0; j < p; ++j)
        for (size_t k = 0; k < n; ++k)
            ...

With an additional nesting, the second is obviously much more work.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense. But I was expecting something more like magical properties of CPU cache I didn't understand thoroughly. –  Siyuan Ren Nov 6 '13 at 4:28

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