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I write a demo about communication between windows and linux.

The performance is only 40MB/s under the gigabit network environment.

Is there any way to upgrade the performance? And I don't know why it so slow.


the code in windows as client

#include "stdafx.h"


#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN

#include <windows.h>
#include <winsock2.h>
#include <ws2tcpip.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>


// Need to link with Ws2_32.lib, Mswsock.lib, and Advapi32.lib
#pragma comment (lib, "Ws2_32.lib")
#pragma comment (lib, "Mswsock.lib")
#pragma comment (lib, "AdvApi32.lib")


#define DEFAULT_BUFLEN 65536
#define DEFAULT_PORT "27015"

int tcpnodelay(int sock) {
    int yes=1;
    return setsockopt(sock,IPPROTO_TCP,TCP_NODELAY,(char*)&yes,sizeof(int));
}

int __cdecl main(int argc, char **argv) 
{
    WSADATA wsaData;
    SOCKET ConnectSocket = INVALID_SOCKET;
    struct addrinfo *result = NULL,
                    *ptr = NULL,
                    hints;
    char sendbuf[DEFAULT_BUFLEN];
    char recvbuf[32];
    unsigned long no;
    unsigned long iResult;
    unsigned long sent;
    int recvbuflen = 32;
    int recv_len, n;
    unsigned long recv_no;

    // Validate the parameters
    if (argc != 2) {
        printf("usage: %s server-name\n", argv[0]);
        return 1;
    }

    // Initialize Winsock
    iResult = WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,2), &wsaData);
    if (iResult != 0) {
        printf("WSAStartup failed with error: %d\n", iResult);
        return 1;
    }

    ZeroMemory( &hints, sizeof(hints) );
    hints.ai_family = AF_UNSPEC;
    hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;
    hints.ai_protocol = IPPROTO_TCP;

    // Resolve the server address and port
    iResult = getaddrinfo(argv[1], DEFAULT_PORT, &hints, &result);
    if ( iResult != 0 ) {
        printf("getaddrinfo failed with error: %d\n", iResult);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    // Attempt to connect to an address until one succeeds
    for(ptr=result; ptr != NULL ;ptr=ptr->ai_next) {

        // Create a SOCKET for connecting to server
        ConnectSocket = socket(ptr->ai_family, ptr->ai_socktype, 
            ptr->ai_protocol);
        if (ConnectSocket == INVALID_SOCKET) {
            printf("socket failed with error: %ld\n", WSAGetLastError());
            WSACleanup();
            return 1;
        }

        // Connect to server.
        iResult = connect( ConnectSocket, ptr->ai_addr, (int)ptr->ai_addrlen);
        if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
            closesocket(ConnectSocket);
            ConnectSocket = INVALID_SOCKET;
            continue;
        }
        break;
    }

    freeaddrinfo(result);

    if (ConnectSocket == INVALID_SOCKET) {
        printf("Unable to connect to server!\n");
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    if (tcpnodelay(ConnectSocket)<0) {
        printf("Can't set TCP_NODELAY!\n");
    }

    recv_len = sizeof(no);
    printf("recv_len: %d\n", recv_len);

    // Send an initial buffer
    memset(sendbuf, 0, DEFAULT_BUFLEN);
    for (no=0; no<1024*1024; no++) {
        sent = 0;
        while (sent < DEFAULT_BUFLEN) {
            iResult = send(ConnectSocket, sendbuf+sent, DEFAULT_BUFLEN-sent, 0);

            if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
                printf("send failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
                closesocket(ConnectSocket);
                WSACleanup();
                return 1;
            }

            sent += iResult;
        }


        n = recv(ConnectSocket, (char *)(&recv_no), recv_len, 0);
        if (recv_len!=n || recv_no!=no) {
            printf("recv len: %d, recv no %ld", n, recv_no);
            exit(1);
        }

    }


    printf("Bytes Sent: %ld\n", iResult);

    // shutdown the connection since no more data will be sent
    iResult = shutdown(ConnectSocket, SD_SEND);
    if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
        printf("shutdown failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
        closesocket(ConnectSocket);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    // cleanup
    closesocket(ConnectSocket);
    WSACleanup();

    return 0;
}

the code in linux as server

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h> 
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>

int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
  int sockfd, newsockfd, portno, clilen;
  char buffer[65536];
  unsigned int no;
  unsigned long read_size;
  struct sockaddr_in serv_addr, cli_addr;
  int  n;
  int send_len;

  /* First call to socket() function */
  sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
  if (sockfd < 0) 
  {
    perror("ERROR opening socket");
    exit(1);
  }
  /* Initialize socket structure */
  bzero((char *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr));
  portno = 27015;
  serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
  serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
  serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno);

  /* Now bind the host address using bind() call.*/
  if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr,
           sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0)
  {
    perror("ERROR on binding");
    exit(1);
  }

  /* Now start listening for the clients, here process will
   * go in sleep mode and will wait for the incoming connection
   */
  listen(sockfd,5);
  clilen = sizeof(cli_addr);

  /* Accept actual connection from the client */
  newsockfd = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&cli_addr, 
                     &clilen);
  if (newsockfd < 0) 
  {
    perror("ERROR on accept");
    exit(1);
  }

  send_len = sizeof(no);
  printf("send_len: %d\n", send_len);

  /* If connection is established then start communicating */
  bzero(buffer,65536);
  for (no=0; no<1024*1024; no++) {
    read_size = 0;
    while (read_size < 65536) {
      n = read( newsockfd,buffer+read_size,65536-read_size );
      if (n < 0)
      {
        perror("ERROR reading from socket");
        exit(1);
      }
      read_size += n;
    }


    n = write(newsockfd, &no, send_len);
    if (n < send_len) {
      printf("send len: %d\n", n);
      exit(1);
    }
  }
  printf("the message size: %d\n", n);

  /* Write a response to the client */
  n = write(newsockfd,"I got your message",18);
  if (n < 0)
  {
    perror("ERROR writing to socket");
    exit(1);
  }

  close(newsockfd);

  return 0; 
}
share|improve this question
    
Don't send in a loop. Just call send() once with the entire buffer. If recv() returns zero it is end of stream, and you must stop reading the socket. –  EJP Oct 25 '13 at 4:30
    
@JimLewis My work is to sent lots of data to store, and every data length is 64KB. I expect the performance to be 80MB/s. :-) –  mzgcz Oct 25 '13 at 4:41
    
@EJP Yes, if I send the entire buffer, the performance will be to 90MB/s. But my work need to send every 64KB data and receive feed back, then send the next 64KB. :-( –  mzgcz Oct 25 '13 at 4:45
    
So write your test accordingly. –  EJP Oct 25 '13 at 10:06
    
You are opening a TCP connection, sending 64KB, closing it again? –  Martin James Oct 25 '13 at 11:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You answered your problem yourself:

Yes, if I send the entire buffer, the performance will be to 90MB/s. But my work need to send every 64KB data and receive feed back, then send the next 64KB.

You can send roughly 81,200 full-sized frames per second on a gigabit ethernet, respectively about 120MiB/s (which includes headers for TCP and IP, so effectively you can expect somewhat less).
TCP will start with with sub-optimal default values (sub-optimal for your gigabit LAN, but safe for a "general" unknown network) for several "tuneable" parameters (MTU, window size) and will adaptively adjust these. That happens quickly, but not instantly. Therefore, the effective 90MiB/s that you see when sending all your data in one bulk is absolutely realistic.

Now the problem is, this is the practical (and more or less theoretical) maximum that you can achieve, if you always keep the wire busy.

Waiting for a server reply is the exact opposite, it lets the wire go "idle" in between (as far as the data your're sending is concerned) at least until the reply has been received and acknowledged (which, on Windows in particular may take a quite non-zero time, by default ACKs are sent out only every 200ms or when at least 2 of them are queued -- google TcpDelAckTicks for more info). Although this "idle time" is rather short, this is a very serious impact to the maximum throughput that you can achieve. It is equivalent to what one calls a "pipeline stall" in other fields.

Try to overlap your sends and replies, if this is allowable by your protocol. That is, send at least two (better yet three) of your 65kiB blocks out, and only then receive the answer from the server. This way, the TCP stack has always data that it can send out to keep the wire busy and make use of the available bandwidth.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you're right. Keep the wire busy, can make more use of the available bandwidth. –  mzgcz Oct 28 '13 at 1:30

Maybe it's a good idea to send my data as long as I can.

It can help reduce the packets, and up the speed.

share|improve this answer
    
As suggested yesterday in comments. –  EJP Oct 26 '13 at 12:29
    
@EJP Yes, but some details need to think. And I'll still find other ways to solve the problem. –  mzgcz Oct 26 '13 at 13:01
    
Some details such as what? Other ways such as what? Just write the entire buffer in one statement. No details or other ways required there. –  EJP Oct 26 '13 at 23:36

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