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I am working on an example Rails application using AngularJS to feed from a JSON backend. The code is listed below. I am having issues sharing factory data between two routes, each controlled by a separate controller (which are effectively the same in this example).

Here is a scenario:

  • Assume that I have navigated to the /lists path and refreshed the browser. My list of People will appear.
  • I click on a Person, which will toggled it as selected and highlight it in red.
  • I navigate to the /roller path, but that Person is not selected.
  • I navigate back to the /lists path, but the Person is no longer selected there.
  • I repeat the steps without a browser refresh, which now maintains selection of any People.

Here is another scenario:

  • Assume that I have navigated to the /roller path and refreshed the browser.
  • I click on a Person to select it.
  • I navigate to the /lists path, where that Person is also selected.
  • I navigate back to the /roller path, where that Person is still selected.

Neither scenario is consistent. Essentially, the behavior is not predictable (with my limited understanding of Angular's inner workings). Both routes will either maintain selections or not maintain selections upon navigating away. I would like to know what is happening within Angular so that I can find reliable alternatives to this use case.

(body of index.html)

<header>
  <nav>
    <a id="logo" href="/#/"><h2>Roller</h2></a>
    <ul class="links">
      <li><a href="/#/people">People</a></li>
      <li><a href="/#/lists">Lists</a></li>
    </ul>
  </nav>
</header>

<div id="main" ng-app="RollerApp">
  <ng-view></ng-view>
</div>

lists.html

<div ng-controller="ListCtrl">
  <ul>
    <li ng-repeat="person in people">
    <a class="selected-{{ person.selected }}" ng-click="toggleSelect( person )">{{ person.name }}</a>
    </li>
  </ul>
</div>

roller.html

<div ng-controller="RollerCtrl">
  <ul>
    <li ng-repeat="person in people">
    <a class="selected-{{ person.selected }}" ng-click="toggleSelect( person )">{{ person.name }}</a>
    </li>
  </ul>
</div>

roller.js

rollerApp = angular.module('RollerApp', ['People']);

rollerApp.config(['$routeProvider', '$locationProvider', function($routeProvider, $locationProvider){
  $routeProvider.when('/', {
    templateUrl: 'assets/roller.html'
  }).when('/lists', {
    templateUrl: 'assets/lists.html'
  }).otherwise({
    template: 'Not Found'
  });
}]);

roller_ctrl.js

rollerApp = angular.module('RollerApp');

rollerApp.controller('RollerCtrl', ['$scope', 'Person', function($scope, Person){
  $scope.people = Person.all();

  $scope.toggleSelect = function(person){
    person.selected = !person.selected;
  };
}]);

list_ctrl.js

rollerApp = angular.module('RollerApp');

rollerApp.controller('ListCtrl', ['$scope', 'Person', function($scope, Person){
  $scope.people = Person.all();

  $scope.toggleSelect = function(person){
    person.selected = !person.selected;
  };
}]);

person_factory.js

people = angular.module('People', ['ngResource']);

people.factory('Person', ['$resource', '$q', function($resource, $q){
  var _person = $resource('people/:id', {id: '@id'}, {});
  var people = null;

  function query(){
    if(!people){
      var deferred = $q.defer();
      people = _person.query(function(success){
        deferred.resolve(success);
      }, function(failure){
        deferred.reject(failure);
      });
      return deferred.promise;
    }else{
      return people;
    }
  }

  return {
    all: function(){
      return query();
    }
  }
}])

styles.css

a.selected-true { color: red }

Edited to include an implementation of @jpmorin's suggestion

Supplementary Question

How would I use a promises-based approach when using a factory to consume data from another factory?

list-factory.js

lists = angular.module('Lists', ['ngResource']);

lists.factory('List', ['$resource', '$q', 'Person', function($resource, $q, Person){
  var _list = $resource('lists/:id', {id: '@id'}, {});
  var people = Person.all();
  var lists = null;

  function query(){
    if(!lists){
      var deferred = $q.defer();
      lists = _list.query(function(success){
        success.forEach(function(list){
          people.then(function(value){
            addPeopleToList(list, value);
          });
        });
        deferred.resolve(success);
      }, function(failure){
        deferred.reject(failure);
      });
      return deferred.promise;
    }else{
      return lists;
    }
  }

  function personById(id, people){
    return people.filter(function(person){ return id === person.id })[0];
  }

  function addPeopleToList(list, people){
    ids = list.people.map(function(person){ return person.id });
    list.people = ids.map(function(id){ return personById(id, people) });
  }

  return {
    all: function(){
      return query();
    }
  }
}])

The above implementation of List succeeds in the other half of my original problem (which I scaled down to simplify the example). However, I am wary of letting this 'List' factory know that the value returned from Person.all() is a promise. Aside from wrapping these components with my own 'classes' (which is usually the preference), is there another way of limiting this cross-factory knowledge?

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I think the problem might come from your factory's query function. Here with a plunker, I simulate your database call with $q and $timeout and it works. plnkr.co/edit/Q5NbIuj2JUMxjf8OkT8J?p=preview. –  jpmorin Oct 25 '13 at 5:52
    
@jpmorin I have updated the example above. Promises does seem like the way to go. Though, would you mind taking a look at the supplementary question regarding implementation exposure? –  subjectego Oct 25 '13 at 15:41
1  
It was late and I think that I made an error in my code. Here look at the updated demo: plnkr.co/edit/Q5NbIuj2JUMxjf8OkT8J?p=preview. Look at the Person factory, it checks if the data is already cached or call the database. In both cases it will return a promise. Now, in your controllers, you need to use a callback to know when the async call is done like: Person.all().then(function(data) { $scope.data = data; }); –  jpmorin Oct 25 '13 at 16:26
    
Also, is there a reason why you are using $resource instead of $http, as it seems that you do not use it except for the initial query? For example, you are filtering the cached list to get a single person, instead of using $resource.get. –  jpmorin Oct 25 '13 at 16:35
    
The more complete implementation is using additional CRUD routes. ngResource seemed to cater to it. The filtering is intended to obtain the existing references to Person objects matching the .ids stored with the List. Is there a more appropriate way of achieving that? –  subjectego Oct 25 '13 at 17:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I create a demo trying to simulate your database call using $q and $timeout in your Person factory.

DEMO http://plnkr.co/edit/Q5NbIuj2JUMxjf8OkT8J?p=preview

On the first call, the data is requested from the database, but it is then cached for the next calls. Since they are objects and their references are passed through out your application, any modifications that you do will be available everywhere else. Here we use promises since it is an async call and we do not know when the data will be available. So, in your controllers, you have to wait for the callback of the promise using:

Person.all().then(function(data) { 
    $scope.people = data;
});

There will be a small delay on the first call, but the next ones will be instant using the cached data.

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