Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a program that runs when the functions have not been defined. When I put code into a function it does not execute the code it contains. Does anyone know why? Some of the code is:

def new_directory():  

 if not os.path.exists(current_sandbox):  
     os.mkdir(current_sandbox)

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
So, how you call this function ? – Pydev UA Dec 24 '09 at 12:17
1  
Do you have the rights to create that directory? – Felix Kling Dec 24 '09 at 12:20
2  
Try adding print 'here' at the first line in the function. To see if control is going there or not. It might turn out that not os.path.exists(current_sandbox) is giving False every time. – Pratik Deoghare Dec 24 '09 at 12:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Problem 1 is that you define a function ("def" is an abbreviation of "define"), but you don't call it.

def new_directory(): # define the function
 if not os.path.exists(current_sandbox):  
     os.mkdir(current_sandbox)

new_directory() # call the function

Problem 2 (which hasn't hit you yet) is that you are using a global (current_sandbox) when you should use an argument -- in the latter case your function will be generally useful and even usefully callable from another module. Problem 3 is irregular indentation -- using an indent of 1 will cause anybody who has to read your code (including yourself) to go nuts. Stick to 4 and use spaces, not tabs.

def new_directory(dir_path):
    if not os.path.exists(dir_path):  
        os.mkdir(dir_path)

new_directory(current_sandbox)
# much later
new_directory(some_other_path)
share|improve this answer

Your code is actually a definition of a new_directory function. It won't be executed unless you make a call to new_directory(). So, when you want to execute the code from your post, just add a function call like this:

def new_directory():  

 if not os.path.exists(current_sandbox):  
   os.mkdir(current_sandbox)

new_directory()

Not sure if that's the behavior you expect to get.

share|improve this answer
    
But generally much better to put that in an if __name__ == "__main__": block so it won't get executed when the module is merely imported by another. – Peter Hansen Dec 24 '09 at 12:31
    
@Peter Hansen: Indeed the OP needs to move through crawl, walk, run stages, but right now he's stone cold motionless and needs kick-starting. The thought that his script might also be used as a module may quite possibly not have occurred to him. – John Machin Dec 24 '09 at 12:43
def new_directory():  
  if not os.path.exists(current_sandbox):  
     os.mkdir(current_sandbox)

new_directory()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.