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I've been working with the prototype library for some time now and occasionally find myself wishing I had multiple access levels (public, private, and protected). The closest I've come so far is the following:

SampleBase = Class.create({
    /* virtual public constructor */
    initialize: function(arg1, arg2)
    {
        // private variables
        var privateVar1, privateVar2;

        // private methods
        var privateMethod1 = function() { }
        function privateMethod2() { }

        // public (non virtual) methods
        this.publicNonVirtual1 = function() { return privateVar1; }
        this.publicNonVirtual2 = function() { return privateVar2; }
    },
    // public methods (that cannot access privates)
    publicVirtual1: function() { /* Cannot access privates here. */ },
    publicVirtual2: function() { /* Cannot access privates here. */ }
});

This less then ideal for several reasons:

  • No protected level
  • I can have public members that can access private members or public members that can be overridden but not not public member that can access private members and be overridden.
  • My public methods that can be overridden are not prototyped.

I've done some searching but haven't found anything that suggests I can do better without altering how prototype works. Here's some of the more interesting links:

I've seen it suggested that you can provide accessors for my public virtual methods to use by doing something like this:

Message = Class.create({
    initialize: function(message)
    {
        var _message = message;
        this.getMessage = function() { return _message; }
        this.setMessage = function(value) { _message = value; }
    },
    printMessage: function() { console.log(this.getMessage()); },
    appendToMessage: function(value) { this.setMessage(this.getMessage() + value); }
});

This clearly will not work as intended. The goal is to only allow printing and appending to the message from outside of the object. The setter provided to make the virtual public function work also allows full control of the message. It could be changed to make the virtual method little more then a shell as follows:

Message = Class.create({
    initialize: function(message)
    {
        var _message = message;
        this._printMessage = function() { console.log(_message); }
        this._appendToMessage = function(value) { _message += value; }
    },
    printMessage: function() {this._printMessage(); },
    appendToMessage: function(value) { this._appendToMessage(value); }
});

This new version does limit public access for this class but is somewhat redundant. Not to mention if appendToMessage is overriden in a subclass a third party can still call _appendToMessage to access the original method which is not good.

I do have a very dirty idea that will get me close but is a can of worms I'd rather not open. I may post it later but in the mean time does anyone have suggestions for merging the two types of public methods into one useful type or on how to implement protected members.

EDIT: I suspect the lack of feedback (aside from bobince's don't bother comment) mean that I am correct in that you can't take it any farther but I think I'll clarify a little just in case. I don't think it is possible to get anything close to the protection of other languages. I'm more interested in knowing where the limits lie and how accurate my understanding of the principles involved are. I do however think it would be interesting, if not useful, if we could get the various protection levels functioning to the point that non public members don't show up in a for...in loop (or in Prototypes Object.keys which uses for..in) even if it people who know what they are doing can still break the rules by doing things like tinkering with my prototypes. Afterall, its like bobince says " they have no-one to blame but themselves"

Now to comment on an issue raised by bobince:

Even if you made real private/protected variables it still wouldn't get you the full encapsulation an effective security boundary would require. JavaScript's ability to fiddle with the prototypes of built-in types your methods will be using gives an attacker the ability to sabotage the methods.

This is one limitation I do understand and I probably should have mentioned above. However, I am not looking at this from the point of view of protecting my code from someone trying to "hack" it. However, I do have a few things that may be worth noting (or in need of correcting if I am wrong):

  • Only my public members are vulnerable in this way.
  • If my public virtual methods are "compromised" in this way, then the "compromised" methods will still not have access to the private members.
  • If my public (non virtual) members are "compromised" in this way, then, unlike the original version of the method, the "compromised" version will not have access to the private memebers.
  • As far as i know the only way to gain accesses to the private members by methods defined outside of initialize method is too take advantage of a bug in the way some browsers handle eval calls.
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2 Answers 2

How to make a protected member in JavaScript: put an underscore at the start of the name.

Seriously, you're not going to have security boundaries within a JS script that would make real proper protection necessary. Access levels are a trad-OO coder's obsession that make no sense in the context of web scripting. Even if you made real private/protected variables it still wouldn't get you the full encapsulation an effective security boundary would require. JavaScript's ability to fiddle with the prototypes of built-in types your methods will be using gives an attacker the ability to sabotage the methods.

So don't bother try. Just do like the Pythoners do: flag the method as something outsiders shouldn't be calling, and be done with it. If someone uses your code and relies on a member with _ at the start of the name, that's their problem and they have no-one to blame but themselves when their script breaks. Meanwhile you'll make the development and debugging stages easier for yourself by not having strict private and protected members.

Then you can choose per-instance-members (for callback binding convenience) or prototyped members (for efficiency), whether or not you intend them to be private, and you won't trip yourself up on the inconsistency.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I already do exactly as you describe. My question is more because I'm curious about how close JavaScript can get to more traditional OOP style then it is about how practical I think it is to do it. –  drs9222 Dec 27 '09 at 9:19
    
+1, exactly what I wanted to say, but I'd place emphasis on the fact that achieving the access levels is not only impractical but undesirable. Although, @drs, interesting exercise nonetheless. –  Box9 Feb 3 '11 at 10:14

http://www.crockford.com/javascript/private.html

Explains it all...

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+1 for actually answering the question... –  raphinesse Oct 24 '11 at 20:42

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