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I am developing app(with java) where user should be able to fill form and submit data. When the internet connection is available, data should be submitted to the server, and if not, to the local data base(sqllite). So, I need design to abstract data submitting target.

At this moment I am considering Factory method, but I am still not sure.

Comments and suggestions are appreciated!

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Hobo Sapiens, Raedwald, Nathaniel Ford, Andrew, Frank van Puffelen Oct 25 '13 at 21:23

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Indeed, factory would be quite reasonable, but combined with the Strategy pattern (as noticed in the other answers).

So you have an interface:

interface FormSubmitter {
    public void submitForm(FormData data);
}

And two implementations (strategies):

class ServerFormSubmitter implements FormSubmitter {
    @Override
    public void submitForm(FormData data) {
        // submit to the server
    }
}

class LocalFormSubmitter implements FormSubmitter {
    @Override
    public void submitForm(FormData data) {
        // save to DB
    }
}

But you need to choose a proper strategy, here is where factory comes into play:

class FormSubmitterFactory {
    public static FormSubmitter getSubmitter() {
        if (connectionAvailable()) {
            return new ServerFormSubmitter();
        } else {
            return new LocalFormSubmitter();
        }
    }
}

And then, when the time comes you need to submit the form:

FormSubmitterFactory.getSubmitter().submitForm(formData);
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1  
Or you could chain them, meaning that the ServerFormSubmitter could check if a connection is available, and delegate to the LocalFormSubmitter if that's not the case. –  Peter Walser Oct 25 '13 at 7:45
    
But wouldn't it mean that ServerFormSubmitter is responsible for too many things (submitting to server and checking if connection is available and delegating it's work if not)? –  siledh Oct 25 '13 at 7:48
1  
Another great way to handle this transparently (without a factory) would be to create a dispatcher implementation of the strategy (could be called FormSubmitter), which would check which actual strategy (Server, Local) to use and delegate to it. –  Peter Walser Oct 25 '13 at 7:48
    
DispatcherFormSubmitter is indeed a neat idea :) –  siledh Oct 25 '13 at 7:52

The Strategy Pattern can help you here (one strategy interface, and two implementations).

In computer programming, the strategy pattern (also known as the policy pattern) is a software design pattern, whereby an algorithm's behaviour can be selected at runtime. Formally speaking, the strategy pattern defines a family of algorithms, encapsulates each one, and makes them interchangeable.

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Factory method is for creating objects. You need to choose a strategy for submitting a form. Oh, and there is a such pattern! ;-)

EDIT: Even a name is self explaining. You have two strategies: if there is no connection I will #1. If there is connection I will #2.

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I personally will go for decorator instead of strategy. IMHO, strategy are used more for configuration / logic flow, not situational-handling (in this case, connection). This is opinion-based though.

Moreover, when doing something like this:

if(connectionAvailable()){
// insert 1
} else {
// insert 2
}

Can has race condition between connectionAvailable and insertion. It may be little though. This is my suggested design:

interface IFormSubmitter {
    public void submitForm(FormData data);
}

public class SqlLiteFormSubmitter : IFormSubmitter{
    public void submitForm(FormData data){
        //insert into sqlite
    }
}

public class DatabaseFormSubmitter : IFormSubmitter{
    public class DatabaseFormSubmitter(IFormSubmitter reservedSubmitter){
        // property assignment
    }
    public void submitForm(FormData data){
        try{
            // insert into database
        }
        catch(SQLException ex){
            if( isConnectionError(ex) ){
                reservedSubmitter.submitForm(data);
            }
            else{
                throw e;
            }
        }
    }
}

The hard part is, you need to define whether your exception thrown is based on connection or not, based from caught exception object.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice approach. And you are right about the race condition, we have no guarantee that the connection will be still available when invoking the submit method. –  siledh Oct 25 '13 at 10:56
    
another benefit in this design is this design only do one connection to database, reducing roundtrip overhead –  Fendy Oct 25 '13 at 11:00
    
I believe OP was going after connecting to the internet, but you are still right. –  siledh Oct 25 '13 at 11:13

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