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I have a data contract:

[DataContract]
public class Entity
{
   [DataMember]
   public int? Temp
   {
       get;
       set;
   }
   //other properties
}

I need to create Entity objects based on database table information. I have to use SqlDataReader (the requirement) and then map columns to entity properties. I created the auxiliary class which describes mapping using Description attribute:

public class Entity
{
   [Description("TempColumnName")]
   public int? Temp
   {
       get;
       set;
   }
   //other properties
}

How can I avoid creation of additional class in this case? I think that using data contract property names or decorating data contract with additional attributes is a bad idea. Do you have any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
When you say additional class here, do you mean the auxiliary class you have shown above with the Description attribute? I mean, is it this class you want to avoid in your code? –  Halvard Oct 25 '13 at 7:50
    
@Halvard Yes, exactly, sorry for my bad English. –  Qué Padre Oct 25 '13 at 7:52
    
So you don't want to add anything extra (like attributes) to the data contracts and you don't want to create a new class, and there is no conventional mapping used between DataContract and Entity: Your only option is to create a mapping stored in a file (e.g. XML). –  Aidin Nov 1 '13 at 18:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

Your data contract represents the public API that your service exposes to the outside world. Once your service starts being consumed by clients you want to avoid making breaking changes to this contract - particularly if your service is being consumed by clients outside of your control. Of course, if your service is only for "internal" use then you have a bit of flexibility about this.

With the "Program to an abstraction - not to an implementation" philosophy - data (and service) contracts of your WCF service provide the abstraction in a Service-Orientated context analogous to interfaces in the world of Object-Orientation.

If you are sharing your data contracts using .dll's then in my opinion - you cannot get around the fact that you need separate classes to represent your service data contracts and your data model. Using a mapping tool like AutoMapper can significantly cut down on the amount of conversion code. If you try to shoehorn extra information in to your data contracts (say via attributes on Data Members) - you end up leaking information about your data access method in to your published binaries. What happens if in the future you switch to another data access method - or even a NoSQL database? Your changes to the data contracts could potentially break your existing clients using older versions of the binaries.

Before I present an alternative - let me say that the above is what I would do in all scenarios. Your data model and your service API represent fundamentally different beasts, which will change independently of each other as a result of different factors. Despite that fact they often look similar, the context in which both are used and are subject to change are completely different.

Now for a hack...

If you are publishing your service API over a MEX endpoint, when Visual Studio (or really svcutil.exe) generates the proxies - the client gets its own version of the service and data contracts. On the service side, you can do something like this:

[DataContract]
public class Entity
{
    [DataMember]
    public int? Temp { get; set; }

    [Description]
    public int? DbTemp { get; set; }

    [OnSerializing()]
    internal void OnSerializingMethod(StreamingContext context)
    {
        Temp = DbTemp;
    }
}

When Entity instance is populated from the database, the DbTemp property is set. It is only when the instance is serialized in preparation for being sent to the client, that that Temp property is populated.

When your clients generate the proxy and data contracts from the MEX endpoint, the Entity data contract looks like this:

[System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute()]
[System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.Runtime.Serialization", "4.0.0.0")]
[System.Runtime.Serialization.DataContractAttribute(Name="Entity", Namespace="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/WcfService1")]
[System.SerializableAttribute()]
public partial class Entity : object, System.Runtime.Serialization.IExtensibleDataObject, System.ComponentModel.INotifyPropertyChanged {

    [System.NonSerializedAttribute()]
    private System.Runtime.Serialization.ExtensionDataObject extensionDataField;

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.OptionalFieldAttribute()]
    private System.Nullable<int> TempField;

    [global::System.ComponentModel.BrowsableAttribute(false)]
    public System.Runtime.Serialization.ExtensionDataObject ExtensionData {
        get {
            return this.extensionDataField;
        }
        set {
            this.extensionDataField = value;
        }
    }

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public System.Nullable<int> Temp {
        get {
            return this.TempField;
        }
        set {
            if ((this.TempField.Equals(value) != true)) {
                this.TempField = value;
                this.RaisePropertyChanged("Temp");
            }
        }
    }

    public event System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName) {
        System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventHandler propertyChanged = this.PropertyChanged;
        if ((propertyChanged != null)) {
            propertyChanged(this, new System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

Not a sniff of your data access implementation!

Finally - note that you could do the above trick with publishing .dlls - you just publish .dll's containing the "stripped down" data contract above. However, this means you effectively have to manage two different versions of Entity - that used internally by your service and those in the published .dll's. If these get out of sync - good luck debugging that one!

share|improve this answer

Place the description attribute within the data contract, WCF won't use it and whatever process needs the description can use it:

[DataContract]
public class Entity
{
   [DataMember]
   [Description("TempColumnName")]
   public int? Temp
   {
       get;
       set;
   }
   //other properties
}
share|improve this answer
    
Data contract is data contract and I think it's not that cool to overweight it with something else... And this also could give a bad idea to someone to try to check existence of 'Description' attribute in client code. –  Qué Padre Oct 28 '13 at 5:49
    
@QuéPadre a class property is a class property, placing more attributes on one does not overweight to the point of some failure. The requirement as per your post is not to have an adjunct shadow class; to that end the suggestion does just that. If implementation hiding is the goal, then the need for that adjunct class is a requirement and not a nice to have. –  OmegaMan Oct 28 '13 at 12:30
2  
There are valid reasons for not adding junk to the contracts, especially as it will forever tie the public contract to the underlying database. –  Rhys Bevilaqua Oct 29 '13 at 6:07

If you want to avoid an intermediate class perhaps what you need is something like automapper. It can be used to map from IDataTable with minimal configuration, especially in the trival case where column names are the same as field names.

https://github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper

http://www.geekytidbits.com/automapper-with-datatables/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Looks like those projects can help a lot, but in my case I am restricted not to use third part solutions. –  Qué Padre Oct 30 '13 at 5:10

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