Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my program I want to use a structure containing constant variables and keep it on device all long as the program executes to completion.

I have several header files containing the declaration of 'global' functions and their respective '.cu' files for their definitions. I kept this scheme because it helps me contain similar code in one place. e.g. all the 'device' functions required to complete 'KERNEL_1' are separated from those 'device' functions required to complete 'KERNEL_2' along with kernels definitions.

I had no problems with this scheme during compilation and linking. Until I encountered constant variables. I want to use the same constant variable through all kernels and device functions but it doesn't seem to work.

##########################################################################
                                CODE EXAMPLE
###########################################################################
filename: 'common.h'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
typedef struct {
    double height;
    double weight;
    int age;
} __CONSTANTS;

__constant__ __CONSTANTS d_const;

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
filename: main.cu
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
#include "common.h"
#include "gpukernels.h"
int main(int argc, char **argv) {

    __CONSTANTS T;
    T.height   = 1.79;
    T.weight   = 73.2;
    T.age      = 26;

    cudaMemcpyToSymbol(d_const, &T, sizeof(__CONSTANTS));
    test_kernel <<< 1, 16 >>>();
    cudaDeviceSynchronize();
}

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
filename: gpukernels.h
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
__global__ void test_kernel();

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
filename: gpukernels.cu
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
#include <stdio.h>
#include "gpukernels.h"
#include "common.h"

__global__ void test_kernel() {
    printf("Id: %d, height: %f, weight: %f\n", threadIdx.x, d_const.height, d_const.weight);
}

When I execute this code, the kernel executes, displays the thread ids, but the constant values are displayed as zeros. How can I fix this?

MODIFICATIONS AS SUGGESTED

filename: gpukernels.h
----------------------------------------------------------------------

__global__ void test_kernel();

----------------------------------------------------------------------
filename: gpukernels.cu
----------------------------------------------------------------------

#include <stdio.h>
#include "common.h"
#include "gpukernels.h"

extern "C" __constant__ __CONSTANTS d_const;

__global__ void test_kernel() {
    printf("Id: %d, Height: %f, Weight: %f\n", threadIdx.x, d_const.height, d_const.weight);
}

----------------------------------------------------------------------
filename: common.h
----------------------------------------------------------------------

typedef struct {
    double height;
    double weight;
    int age;
} __CONSTANTS;

----------------------------------------------------------------------
filename: main.cu
----------------------------------------------------------------------
#include "common.h"
#include "gpukernels.h"

__constant__ __CONSTANTS d_const;

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

    __CONSTANTS T;
    T.height = 1.79;
    T.weight = 73.2;
    T.age    = 26;

    cudaMemcpyToSymbol(d_const, &T, sizeof(__CONSTANTS));
    test_kernel <<< 1, 16 >>> ();
    cudaDeviceSynchronize();

    return 0;
}

So as suggested, I tried the code, still doesn't work. Did I miss something here?

share|improve this question
    
I have tested your code by including the __global__ function in the same file as for the main function and it works, provided that you change the misprinted d_consts in the cudaMemcpyToSymbol to d_const. –  JackOLantern Oct 25 '13 at 10:00
    
__constant__ symbols are implicitly static. Since in your case you are using separate compilation, the constant symbol should be then declared as extern in every compilation unit (gpukernels.cu in your case) except the one containing the definition (main.cu in your case). –  JackOLantern Oct 25 '13 at 10:05
    
@JackOLantern but Jack in that case I have to write all the code back in the main.cu. which I want to avoid. In my code instead of gpukernels.h I have files such as calculatepdf.h, calculatecdf.h and their respective '.cu' file. I want the constant variable to be accessible to all my kernels in these files as well. –  Psypher Oct 25 '13 at 10:06
    
@JackOLantern so for every other kernel header i need to define it again as extern –  Psypher Oct 25 '13 at 10:08
    
I have posted an answer, see below. I think your second version is ok, but perhaps you forgot to generate a relocatable code? –  JackOLantern Oct 25 '13 at 12:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Below, I report the solution which is working for me. Remember that you are using separate compilation, so do not forget to use Generate Relocatable Device Code (-rdc=true option).

FILE main.cu

#include <cuda.h>
#include <cuda_runtime.h>

typedef struct {
    double height;
    double weight;
    int age;
} __CONSTANTS;

__constant__ __CONSTANTS d_const;

__global__ void test_kernel();

#include <conio.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {

    __CONSTANTS T;
    T.height   = 1.79;
    T.weight   = 73.2;
    T.age      = 26;

    cudaMemcpyToSymbol(d_const, &T, sizeof(__CONSTANTS));
    test_kernel <<< 1, 16 >>>();
    cudaDeviceSynchronize();

    getch();
    return 0;
}

FILE kernel.cu

#include <stdio.h>
#include <cuda.h>
#include <cuda_runtime.h>

typedef struct {
    double height;
    double weight;
    int age;
} __CONSTANTS;

extern __constant__ __CONSTANTS d_const;

__global__ void test_kernel() {
    printf("Id: %d, height: %f, weight: %f\n", threadIdx.x, d_const.height, d_const.weight);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.