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I have a little doubt in my mind, that how javascript interpreter works! Specially for the case I am mentioning here.

var a = 5;
function foo(){
debugger
a = 100;

if(false){
var a = 10;
}

a = 1000;
}

foo();
console.log(a);

Simply copy and paste the above code in browser's console, the expected answer is 1000. What it returns is 5.

I have put debugger knowingly, when it hits debugger, the SCOPE section shows variable a as in scope with undefined. So the further assignment is done to local variable a, that was not meant to be created at all, as it is in false block.

I am aware about the scope of variable is not limited to {}, but it is limited to function. But this case is a surprise!

Can anyone explain this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Little formatting to your code.

var a = 5;
function foo(){
   debugger
   a = 100;

   if(false){
       var a = 10;
   }
   a = 1000;
}

foo();
console.log(a);

Hoisting is the keyword you are looking for. Javascript hoists the variables. Means it puts the declaration of your local variables at top of functions irrespective its going to be executed or not. So after interpretation your code looks like following.

var a = 5;
function foo(){
   var a;
   debugger
   a = 100;

   if(false){
       a = 10;
   }
   a = 1000;
}

foo();
console.log(a);

So a becomes a local variable inside function, hence change of value inside function only changes local variable and not global. Hence console prints 5, global variable, value of which was never changed.

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Thanks! The term hoists let me to another article that had some nice explanation of js interpretion of variable names, functions, and the order that it sees while assigning values to it. Link to article : adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting.html –  Akash Saikia Oct 25 '13 at 11:07

var declarations encompass the entire scope.

function() {
  a = 5;
  var a = 10;
}

is equivalent to:

function() {
  var a;
  a = 5;
  a = 10;
}

So a is a local variable in the scope of the function, not global in the first part and local afterwards (that would be so complicated!).

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Yes, I got the point why it does not behave twice for local and global. But even when it is inside a false block, should it consider for declaration? Any links where i can find, why js interpreter does this while interpreting the code? –  Akash Saikia Oct 25 '13 at 10:28
1  
@Akash: Because it's defined in the specification: es5.github.io/#x10.5 (step 8). The short answer: The function body is evaluated for variable decelerations before the code is executed. –  Felix Kling Oct 25 '13 at 10:29
    
yep this is close to what I wanted to know. An example that i found because of other answers below : adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting.html –  Akash Saikia Oct 25 '13 at 11:02

It's because you have a var a in the code. All declarations in the function are hoisted to the top, even if it looks like var a = 10; will never execute. Remove var and it will behave as expected.

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