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I've installed Ubuntu in a virtual enviroment using Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager and it works great.

However I'd like to enable multiple cores - as seen in the image below my Windows machine has 2 cores: enter image description here

Now when I run the lscpu in Ubunto I get the following info revealing that only 1 core is being utilized: enter image description here

I've tried changing the settings of the virtual box to enable multiple processors but it won't allow me to do so as shown in the image below: enter image description here

How do I enable multiple cores (processors) in my virtual enviroment?

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closed as off-topic by Duck, David Cain, rcs, cadrell0, Luc M Oct 25 '13 at 14:57

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This is not a programming related question and you would do better to seek answers at askubuntu.com –  Duck Oct 25 '13 at 13:18
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your VM is currently running (or "Saved") you can't change that value. Apart from that several sources like this one suggest, that you need need to enable "VT-x" under the Acceleration tab to get this working. I couldn't reproduce that, it works for me without having VT-x enabled.

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Awesome - I had the machien state as saved - I powered it off and I could change the settings - thanks! –  Jordan Axe Oct 25 '13 at 13:50
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