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I have the following matrix

FI1  FI2 YI1 YI2 BAL1 BAL2 GRO1 GRO2  EQ1  EQ2
1 0.22 0.15 0.1 0.1 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05
2 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
3 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
4 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
5 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
6 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Now I would like to have this matrix duplicated 10 times and put in a matrix such that it looks like this (I just show it 2 times here)

FI1  FI2 YI1 YI2 BAL1 BAL2 GRO1 GRO2  EQ1  EQ2
1 0.22 0.15 0.1 0.1 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05
2 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
3 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
4 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
5 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
6 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
1 0.22 0.15 0.1 0.1 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05
2 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
3 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
4 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
5 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
6 0.22 0.00 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Can somebody propose me a simple way to accomplish this? Thanks Andreas

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You'll learn a lot by studying the different answers provided, as each illustrates different tricks and trade-offs. –  Bryan Hanson Oct 25 '13 at 13:30
    
Please consider accepting one of the answers provided to close the question. –  Matthew Plourde Sep 23 at 13:02

4 Answers 4

Here's another way:

do.call(rbind, replicate(10, m, simplify=FALSE)) # where m is your matrix
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If your matrix is called m then you can just use rep() as a matrix is really just an atomic vector and then wrap it up with matrix() using the columns of your original matrix to get the dimensions right. You have to transpose first using t() to get the stacking right (thanks to @MatthewPlourde for pointing that out). This operation is entirely vectorised so should be very fast and efficient.

matrix( rep( t( m ) , 10 ) , ncol = ncol(m) , byrow = TRUE )

Example

m <- matrix( 1:9 , 3 )
matrix( rep( t( m ) , 2 ) , ncol =  ncol(m) , byrow = TRUE )
#     [,1] [,2] [,3]
#[1,]    1    4    7
#[2,]    2    5    8
#[3,]    3    6    9
#[4,]    1    4    7
#[5,]    2    5    8
#[6,]    3    6    9
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2  
OP wants m stacked. This transposes and stacks. You could do matrix(rep(t(m), 2) , ncol=ncol(m) , byrow=TRUE) instead. –  Matthew Plourde Oct 25 '13 at 13:41
    
@MatthewPlourde thanks you are right. Cheers –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 25 '13 at 13:49

Not elegant, but simple enough if you just want to keep working:

m <- matrix(rnorm(60), ncol = 10)
str(m)
m2 <- rbind(m, m, m, m, m, m, m, m, m, m)
str(m2)
share|improve this answer
    
Many many thanks, the first solution is beautiful. –  user2157086 Oct 25 '13 at 13:59

If you have ever used matlab, the repmat function is very useful, as all you have to do is specify the matrix and how many times you want it replicated row and column wise. Here is an R equivalent:

repmat = function(X,m,n){
mx = dim(X)[1]
nx = dim(X)[2]
matrix(t(matrix(X,mx,nx*n)),mx*m,nx*n,byrow=T)} 

m <- matrix(c(1:4), ncol = 2)
repmat(m,2,3)
>
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    1    3    1    3    1    3
[2,]    2    4    2    4    2    4
[3,]    1    3    1    3    1    3
[4,]    2    4    2    4    2    4
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