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I'd like to protect my code from doing the same thing within a directory at the same time, and I need a kind of cross-process mutex for this. Since the directory in question might end up be shared across the network, I though of opening a file for writing as this kind of lock.

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    try {
        FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("lockfile", false);
        try {
            System.out.println("Lock obtained. Enter to exit");
            br.readLine();
            System.out.println("Done");
        }
        finally {
            fos.close();
        }
    } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
        System.out.println("No luck - file locked.");
    }
}

running java -jar dist\LockFileTest.jar twice succeeds! – I see two consoles prompting for Enter.

I've also tried new RandomAccessFile("lockfile", "rw") instead, with the same effect.

Background: windows xp, 32bit, jre1.5.

Where is my mistake? How is it possible?

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1  
Instead of opening the file, you can create the file to obtain the lock & delete the file to release it. – DaoWen Oct 25 '13 at 13:19

Have you tried FileLock?

RandomAccessFile randomAccessFile = new RandomAccessFile("lockfile", "rw");
FileChannel channel = randomAccessFile.getChannel();
FileLock lock = channel.lock();

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
try {
    OutputStream fos = Channels.newOutputStream(channel);
    try {
        System.out.println("Lock obtained. Enter to exit");
        br.readLine();
        System.out.println("Done");
    } finally {
        fos.close();
    }
} catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. This helped. – bohdan_trotsenko Oct 25 '13 at 13:26
    
I updated the code to use the channel instead of creating a new FileOutputStream. Then you only have to close the channel [fos.close()] and the lock will be released. – René Link Oct 25 '13 at 13:28

Using FileOutputStream and/or RandomAccessFile this way wont give you lock over the file..

Instead you should use the RandomAccessFile and get a FileChannel then issue lock on the file..

Following is you example modified:

public static void main(String[] args)throws IOException {
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        try {
            RandomAccessFile raf = new RandomAccessFile(new File("d:/lockfile"), "rw");

            System.out.println("Requesting File Lock");
            FileChannel fileChannel = raf.getChannel();
            fileChannel.lock();
            try {
                System.out.println("Lock obtained. Enter to exit");
                br.readLine();
                System.out.println("Done");
            } finally {
                fileChannel.close();
            }
        } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
            System.out.println("No luck - file locked.");
        }
    }
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