Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

thanks to wonderful responses to this question I understand how to call javascript functions with varargs.

now I'm looking to use apply with a constructor

I found some interesting information on this post.

but my code is throwing errors

attempt 1:

var mid_parser = new Parser.apply(null, mid_patterns);

error:

TypeError: Function.prototype.apply called on incompatible [object Object]

attempt 2: attempt 1:

var mid_parser = new Parser.prototype.apply(null, mid_patterns);

error:

TypeError: Function.prototype.apply called on incompatible [object Object]

attempt 2:

function Parser()
{
    this.comparemanager = new CompareManager(arguments);
}

mid_patterns = [objA,objB,objC]
var mid_parser = new Parser();
Parser.constructor.apply(mid_parser, mid_patterns);

error:

syntax_model.js:91: SyntaxError: malformed formal parameter

attempt 3:

var mid_parser = Parser.apply(null, mid_patterns);

error :

TypeError: this.init is undefined // init is a function of Parser.prototype

I have a workaround for the time being:

function Parser()
{
    if(arguments.length) this.init.call(this,arguments); // call init only if arguments
}
Parser.prototype = {
   //...
   init: function()
   {
         this.comparemanager = new CompareManager(arguments);
   }
   //...
}

var normal parser = new Parser(objA,objB,objC);

mid_patterns = [objA,objB,objC]
var dyn_parser = new Parser();
dyn_parser.init.apply(dyn_parser, mid_patterns);

this works pretty well, but it's not as clean and universal as I'd like.

is it possible in javascript to call a constructor with varargs?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You could use apply and pass an empty object as the this argument:

var mid_parser = {};
Parser.apply(mid_parser, mid_patterns);

But that solution will not take care about the prototype chain.

You could create a Parser object, using the new operator, but without passing arguments, and then use apply to re-run the constructor function:

var mid_parser = new Parser();
Parser.apply(mid_parser, mid_patterns);
share|improve this answer
    
+1, fantastic thanks –  Fire Crow Dec 24 '09 at 18:30
    
Very interesting. I've played around with this a little and it works very nicely in certain cases. Not all constructors support this approach. Date, for example: var date = new Date; Date.call(date, 1984, 3, 26). –  davidchambers Sep 26 '11 at 4:34
    
Function.apply(new Function(),arg) /*Is a one line solution*/ –  TERMtm Jan 5 '12 at 17:57
    
This will only work for constructors of objects you control - most constructors wont play along - there is a better way though by making a temporary constructor –  reconbot Jul 11 '12 at 18:03

You can exploit the fact that you can chain constructors using apply(...) to achieve this, although this requires the creation of a proxy class. The construct() function below lets you do:

var f1 = construct(Foo, [2, 3]);
// which is more or less equivalent to
var f2 = new Foo(2, 3);

The construct() function:

function construct(klass, args) {

  function F() {
    return klass.apply(this, arguments[0]); 
  }; 

  F.prototype = klass.prototype; 

  return new F(args);

}

Some sample code that uses it:

function Foo(a, b) {
  this.a = a; this.b = b;
}

Foo.prototype.dump = function() {
  console.log("a = ", this.a);
  console.log("b = ", this.b);
};

var f = construct(Foo, [7, 9]);

f.dump();
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't quite handle all cases. You need to return the value from klass.apply in F(): function F() { return klass.apply(this, arguments[0]); }. This handles cases where constructor functions return the value to be used as the instance. –  Monroe Thomas Nov 16 '12 at 3:27
    
@MonroeThomas Good point, have updated. –  mjs Nov 16 '12 at 12:44

A better solution is to create a temporary constructor function, apply the prototype of the class that you want (to ensure prototype chains are preserved) and then apply the constructor manually. This prevents calling the constructor twice unnecessarily...

applySecond = function(){
    function tempCtor() {};
    return function(ctor, args){
        tempCtor.prototype = ctor.prototype;
        var instance = new tempCtor();
        ctor.apply(instance,args);
        return instance;
    }
}();

I tested the performance and found that this method is, in fact, a bit slower in the very simple case. However, it only takes the construction of a single Date() object in the constructor for this to be more efficient. Also, don't forget that some constructors may throw exceptions if there are no parameters passed, so this is also more correct.

My validation code:

var ExpensiveClass = function(arg0,arg1){
    this.arg0 = arg0;
    this.arg1 = arg1;
    this.dat = new Date();
}

var CheapClass = function(arg0,arg1){
    this.arg0 = arg0;
    this.arg1 = arg1;
}

applyFirst = function(ctor, args){
    var instance = new ctor();
    ctor.apply(instance, args);
    return instance;
}

applySecond = function(){
    function tempCtor() {};
    return function(ctor, args){
        tempCtor.prototype = ctor.prototype;
        var instance = new tempCtor();
        ctor.apply(instance,args);
        return instance;
    }
}();

console.time('first Expensive');
for(var i = 0; i < 10000; i++){
    test = applyFirst(ExpensiveClass ,['arg0','arg1']);
}
console.timeEnd('first Expensive');

console.time('second Expensive');
for(var i = 0; i < 10000; i++){
    test = applySecond(ExpensiveClass ,['arg0','arg1']);
}
console.timeEnd('second Expensive');

console.time('first Cheap');
for(var i = 0; i < 10000; i++){
    test = applyFirst(CheapClass,['arg0','arg1']);
}
console.timeEnd('first Cheap');

console.time('second Cheap');
for(var i = 0; i < 10000; i++){
    test = applySecond(CheapClass,['arg0','arg1']);
}
console.timeEnd('second Cheap');

The results:

first Expensive: 76ms
second Expensive: 66ms
first Cheap: 52ms
second Cheap: 52ms
share|improve this answer
    
I would quantify that its better only in the case that the "ctor" function is expensive. reason being, that this implimentation involves calling two functions as well, just that tempCtor is an empty function. The apply call to ctor (ctor.apply) would execute as a normal function, only with the new keyword would it have the overhead of constructing a new object. –  Fire Crow Oct 27 '10 at 16:27
    
I updated my post to include some tests. While it is true that with very simple constructors, this method is slower, it is trivial to make the constructor "expensive" enough to warrant this method. Also, as mentioned in my update, this improved method handles constructors that throw exceptions where arguments are not supplied or of the incorrect type. –  jordancpaul Nov 26 '10 at 2:40
    
updated my post one more time. It's now equally fast in the simple case, and even faster in the expensive case. –  jordancpaul Dec 7 '10 at 9:21
4  
imho, this is a way better solution than the accepted answer. With CMSs technique you risk initializing your object twice. –  Arthur Goldsmith Mar 2 '11 at 22:39
    
One nitpicky issue: the instance you're returning is now an instance of 'tempCtor' rather than ctor. Not a huge issue in all/most cases, but users should understand that and the problems it might create. –  Nathan Nov 7 '12 at 18:12

To complete @CMS solution and preserve the prototype chain, you can do this:

var mid_parser = {};
mid_parser.__proto__ = Parser.prototype;
Parser.apply(mid_parser, mid_patterns);

As a side note, it will not work with IE 8-.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.