Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

whats the meaning of this line

<input type=text name="name" value="<?= $name ?>

if we are to declare as PHP shouldn't we write <?php instead of <?=

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

<?= are PHP short open tags, which can be enabled (or disabled) via the short_open_tag directive in php.ini (quoting) :

This directive also affects the shorthand <?= , which is identical to <? echo . Use of this shortcut requires short_open_tag to be on.

And:

Also if disabled, you must use the long form of the PHP open tag (<?php ?> ).

This means your portion of code :

<input type=text name="name" value="<?= $name ?>

Is equivalent to this one :

<input type=text name="name" value="<?php echo $name; ?>

But only when short open tags are enabled.

And, as a sidenote : short open tags are not always enabled -- in fact, they are disabled by default, with recent versions of PHP.

Which means it might be wise to not depend on those, at least if you want to deploy your application on servers on which you are not administrator.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, relying on short tags is asking for a broken heart when you deploy on a server that is configured to not allow them :) – JC. Dec 24 '09 at 21:20
    
In defense of short tags, they're invaluable if you use PHP as its own templating layer. Additionally, it can be set PHP_INI_PERDIR -- i.e., in .htaccess on a per-app basis. – Frank Farmer Dec 24 '09 at 21:58
1  
"<?=" won't be deprecated on PHP6 and since PHP5.3 "is now always available, regardless of the short_open_tag php.ini option." – Carlos C Soto Feb 13 '14 at 21:10
1  
I know this is an old answer but it may be useful to others if you updated it to reflect the current documentation. In particular, the fact that since 5.4.0, <?= is enabled, even without short tags. – Tom Fenech Apr 20 '14 at 10:38
    
Why if I add a function at the variable inside the shortcourt tag(like: <? addslashes($string); ?> ) didn't print anything? It's an error adding the echo function using the shortcourt (<? echo addslashes($string); ?>), or is better use it in normal <?php ?> tags? – Andrea_86 Oct 22 '14 at 10:32

<?= ... ?> is shorthand for <?php echo ... ?>

share|improve this answer

using short tags is generally frowned upon nowadays but it's still an option in the php.ini. It's fine, it's just poor coding style and has some repercussions if you use multiple dynamic languages.

share|improve this answer
    
Not to mention short tags are deprecated as of php6 – Matt Dec 24 '09 at 18:15
    
Considering PHP 6 is far from finished (it's not even in alpha stage yet), things can change -- even if it probably will not for this specific point. – Pascal MARTIN Dec 24 '09 at 18:17
1  
PHP6? who? what? where? when? – gahooa Dec 24 '09 at 18:46
1  
I know this is an old answer but it may be useful to others if you updated it to reflect the current documentation. In particular, the fact that since 5.4.0, <?= is enabled, even without short tags. – Tom Fenech Apr 20 '14 at 10:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.