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which one is best way to implements OnClickListener Interface in Android.

/*- First - */

public class EmployeeActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener
{

    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

    Button btnUpdate = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnUpdate);
        Button btnEdit = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnEdit);

        btnUpdate.setOnClickListener(this);
        btnEdit.setOnClickListener(this);

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {

        if (v == btnAddEmployee) 
      {}
    if (v == btnUpdate) 
    {}
}

/- Second -/

public class EmployeeActivity extends Activity {

    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

        Button btnUpdate = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnUpdate);
        Button btnEdit = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnEdit);

        btnUpdate.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub

            }
        });

        btnEdit.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub

            }
        });
    }
}
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Tanis.7x, blackbelt, Jan Dvorak, laalto, MichaC Oct 26 '13 at 9:26

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Don't ask what's better - that's a subjective question. I don't think this can be converted to a "list of cons and pros" question, either. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 25 '13 at 15:05
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5 Answers

which one is best way to implements OnClickListener Interface in Android

This depends solely on what fits best for you as the developer. They all work the same and you even have another option to declare onClick in xml. I like the first especially if you will have multiple Buttons that you want to share functionality. But a better way to do the first is to switch on the id of the View being clicked. Something like

@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
    int id = v.getId();
    switch (id)
    {
        case R.id.btnUpdate:
           // do work
           break;
        case R.id.btnEdit
           // do work for edit button
           break;
    }
    // put shared functionality code like starting an Activity, calling a method, etc...
}

The second I like to use if there is only one or two Buttons and they have completely different functionality. I think this way makes the code look more cluttered and messy if you have too many Buttons. But these all work the same and won't change the performance of your app.

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Using switch is probably the cleanest way and easier to distinguish than an endless row of if/else if/... statements. –  Nobu Games Oct 25 '13 at 14:53
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Neither one is "better." Which one you use is a personal choice, and will depend on which one fits your coding style.

The advantage to the second method is that you can have a unique OnClickListener for each View. The advantage to the first option is that all of your onClick() code is in one place.

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The first method is good. But rather than if-else. use switch case.

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

    Button btnUpdate = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnUpdate);
        Button btnEdit = (Button)findViewById(R.id.btnEdit);

        btnUpdate.setOnClickListener(this);
        btnEdit.setOnClickListener(this);

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {

       switch(v.getId())
      {
      case R.id.btnUpdate:
        //your work
       break
}
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I prefer your approach ;) –  Diego Palomar Oct 25 '13 at 14:43
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Your first example is incorrect, you shouldn't compare the objects like that. You need to do something like:

switch(v.getId()) {
    case R.id.yourButton:
        ...
}

They are both equivalent for the most part, except the second allocates a new object for each listener. If I have lots of buttons on one screen I like to organize it like you have in the first example to avoid more boilerplate code.

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Actually...since android tools 14, using if statements are strongly advised : See Library Project Revamp –  petey Oct 25 '13 at 14:47
    
Of course you can store a button as a member (or final variable) and compare onClick's view argument with it using the equality operator "==". They will both reference the exact same instance. We're not dealing with the "string comparison" problem in Java here. Android's touch input dispatcher does not create copies of button objects or any other clickable view. –  Nobu Games Oct 25 '13 at 14:50
1  
@petey That is for using library projects. Also, I think you misread what it is saying. You can't use it as the argument for a switch statement because for library projects they won't be final and could change. Doing it how I have it is perfectly fine because getId() is constant. –  trevor-e Oct 25 '13 at 14:55
    
Ahh yes. you are right. –  petey Oct 25 '13 at 14:56
    
@NobuGames I would be very weary of doing so, and it's definitely not best practice. It's better to just compare against a known value like an ID. Any link to what you are saying in your last statement? I'm curious now to read up on it. –  trevor-e Oct 25 '13 at 14:59
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It depends upon the number of elements that you have in your current activity. I prefer the second method for few buttons (2 or 3). Any thing more than that I use first method and ofcourse with a switch statement.

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