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So I started to create TDD tests for a new WCF service I wanted to create. In TDD, you create the test, and start adding objects that don't exist yet into your tests. First object I wanted to test was that the service is not null after instantiated.

Then then I said wait, how the hell can you do that in WCF...a service extension is .svc. Yes there's a .svc.cs but the main parent is .svc. I don't see a way I can to TDD on this part where you've have something like this but it'd create an .svc instead of just a .cs:

 [TestMethod]
    public void UponInitialization_ServiceIsNotNull()
    {
        // Arrange
        // Act
        NyNewService service = new MyNewService();

        // Assert
        Assert.IsTrue(service != null);
    }

This is a very fundamental necessary first test, testing the very simplest possible from the start...this is very common on any TDD or XP team doing TDD.

Any thoughts on how I can create a new .svc from within my test here? not a plain .cs?

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I believe that constructor either throws exception or returns non-null value. So, actually this test does nothing –  Sergey Berezovskiy Oct 25 '13 at 15:21
1  
.svc is just a hosting concern, not implementation detail. TDD is about unit testing mainly - which means no external dependencies like file system or hosts. To test the .svc file you need an integration test. –  Sunny Milenov Oct 25 '13 at 19:22
    
@Sunny, no you need TDD tests on your service classes, the service itself. And via TDD you create classes and methods, fail, make them pass, etc. –  MSSucks Oct 28 '13 at 4:56
    
@CoffeeAddict: true. You test the class. Not the .svc. –  Sunny Milenov Oct 28 '13 at 13:10
    
Why do you want to test creating a service instance? You should test your implementation/logic not WCF (WCF is hosting details, so extract you logic from the service layer). You can't write test for everything. –  Jocke Oct 28 '13 at 20:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd start with creating acceptance test for non-existing WCF service:

private Uri _baseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost:8713/service1");
private IService1 _client;

[SetUp]
public void Setup()
{
    var binding = new BasicHttpBinding();
    var endpoint = new EndpointAddress(_baseAddress);
    var factory = new ChannelFactory<IService1>(binding, endpoint);
    _client = factory.CreateChannel();
}

[TearDown]
public void TearDown()
{
    if (_client != null)
        ((ICommunicationObject)_client).Close();
}

[Test]
public void ShouldReturnSampleData()
{
    Assert.That(_client.GetData(42), Is.EqualTo("You entered: 42"));
}

Keep in mind, that nothing is created yet - we start from test. Now you can create service interface:

public interface IService1
{
    string GetData(int value);
}

Test now compiles, but of course, it fails with error

Attempted to get contract type for IService1, but that type is not a ServiceContract, nor does it inherit a ServiceContract.

Good, that's because we should mark our interface with [ServiceContract] attribute. We add this attribute and run test again:

Method GetData is not supported on this proxy, this can happen if the method is not marked with OperationContractAttribute or if the interface type is not marked with ServiceContractAttribute.

Ok, mark our service interface with required attributes:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IService1
{
    [OperationContract]
    string GetData(int value);
}

Now we see another error (because nothing is actually running our non-existing service)

There was no endpoint listening at http://localhost:8713/service1 that could accept the message. This is often caused by an incorrect address or SOAP action. See InnerException, if present, for more details.

We can use ServiceHost to run our service (at this moment we need to create service class to compile tests):

private ServiceHost _host;

[SetUp]
public void Setup()
{
    _host = new ServiceHost(typeof(Service1), _baseAddress);
    ServiceMetadataBehavior smb = new ServiceMetadataBehavior();
    smb.HttpGetEnabled = true;
    smb.MetadataExporter.PolicyVersion = PolicyVersion.Policy15;
    _host.Description.Behaviors.Add(smb);
    _host.Open();

    // creating client as above
}

[TearDown]
public void TearDown()
{
    // closing client as above

    if (_host != null)
        _host.Close();
}

You also need to implement IService1 interface by service class (otherwise test will fail):

public class Service1 : IService1
{
    public string GetData(int value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Now I'd created some unit-tests for Service1 class in order to implement GetData functionality. With these tests passing you will have acceptance test passing also. Thats it. You did test first, and your WCF service is completely ready to be hosted.

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this is great. Only thing I might want to do is mock...rather than create whole classes to implement the IService1 which would require a LOT less code to do the same thing (call a method and tell what to send into it and what you expect back..tell it so it's always consistent when you run your test) –  MSSucks Oct 25 '13 at 20:40
    
if you have your IService1 and then you want to generate a new WCF.svc service how can you do that with ReSharper, etc. You can only rightclick and create .cs classes. I'd like to be able to create WCF services off an interface or even just a service itself with a shortcut using ReSharper from my TDD test for an unimplemented classs –  MSSucks Oct 25 '13 at 20:55
    
I've been told by a good friend that there are DI frameworks that you can mock without interfaces and that using interfaces for DI is in fact unecessary. For example Spring in Java uses no interfaces. Yes a lot of people use interfaces but you can end up also using so many that your classes no longer adhere to the SOLID principals in terms of your class being single responsibility. It's better to make your classes adhere to the single responsibility than to inherit a ton of interfaces which makes it responsible for more than it should be. –  MSSucks Oct 28 '13 at 4:52
    
Is ChannelFactory a custom class you created? –  MSSucks Oct 28 '13 at 4:54
    
@CoffeeAddict nope, it's System.ServiceModel.ChannleFactory. Also I don't understand how interfaces related to SRP. If your class adheres SRP, then usually you have single interface to inherit. I didn't use mocks here, because it's acceptance test, which should exercise full stack of application. Nothing should be mocked. That's unit tests (tests of Service1 class) where you should use mocks, because units should be tested in isolation. And about ReSharper - can't help you here, I prefer CodeRush to ReSharper –  Sergey Berezovskiy Oct 28 '13 at 9:48

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