Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to implement Actor calculation model over threads on C++ using boost::thread. But program throws weird exception during execution. Exception isn't stable and some times program works in correct way.

There my code:

actor.hpp

class Actor {

  public:
    typedef boost::function<int()> Job;

  private:
    std::queue<Job>             d_jobQueue;
    boost::mutex                d_jobQueueMutex;
    boost::condition_variable   d_hasJob;
    boost::atomic<bool>         d_keepWorkerRunning;
    boost::thread               d_worker;

    void workerThread();

  public:
    Actor();
    virtual ~Actor();

    void execJobAsync(const Job& job);

    int execJobSync(const Job& job);
};

actor.cpp

namespace {

int executeJobSync(std::string          *error,
                   boost::promise<int> *promise,
                   const Actor::Job     *job)
{
    int rc = (*job)();

    promise->set_value(rc);
    return 0;
}

}

void Actor::workerThread()
{
    while (d_keepWorkerRunning) try {
        Job job;
        {
            boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> g(d_jobQueueMutex);

            while (d_jobQueue.empty()) {
                d_hasJob.wait(g);
            }

            job = d_jobQueue.front();
            d_jobQueue.pop();
        }

        job();
    }
    catch (...) {
        // Log error
    }
}

void Actor::execJobAsync(const Job& job)
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock g(d_jobQueueMutex);
    d_jobQueue.push(job);
    d_hasJob.notify_one();
}

int Actor::execJobSync(const Job& job)
{
    std::string error;
    boost::promise<int> promise;
    boost::unique_future<int> future = promise.get_future();

    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock g(d_jobQueueMutex);
        d_jobQueue.push(boost::bind(executeJobSync, &error, &promise, &job));
        d_hasJob.notify_one();
    }

    int rc = future.get();

    if (rc) {
        ErrorUtil::setLastError(rc, error.c_str());
    }

    return rc;
}

Actor::Actor()
: d_keepWorkerRunning(true)
, d_worker(&Actor::workerThread, this)
{
}

Actor::~Actor()
{
    d_keepWorkerRunning = false;
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock g(d_jobQueueMutex);
        d_hasJob.notify_one();
    }
    d_worker.join();
}

Actually exception that is thrown is boost::thread_interrupted in int rc = future.get(); line. But form boost docs I can't reason of this exception. Docs says

Throws: - boost::thread_interrupted if the result associated with *this is not ready at the point of the call, and the current thread is interrupted.

But my worker thread can't be in interrupted state.

When I used gdb and set "catch throw" I see that back trace looks like

throw thread_interrupted

boost::detail::interruption_checker::check_for_interruption

boost::detail::interruption_checker::interruption_checker

boost::condition_variable::wait

boost::detail::future_object_base::wait_internal

boost::detail::future_object_base::wait

boost::detail::future_object::get

boost::unique_future::get

I looked into boost sources but can't get why interruption_checker decided that worker thread is interrupted.

So someone C++ guru, please help me. What I need to do to get correct code? I'm using:

boost 1_53

Linux version 2.6.18-194.32.1.el5 Red Hat 4.1.2-48

gcc 4.7

EDIT

Fixed it! Thanks to Evgeny Panasyuk and Lazin. The problem was in TLS management. boost::thread and boost::thread_specific_ptr are using same TLS storage for their purposes. In my case there was problem when they both tried to change this storage on creation (Unfortunately I didn't get why in details it happens). So TLS became corrupted.

I replaced boost::thread_specific_ptr from my code with __thread specified variable.

Offtop: During debugging I found memory corruption in external library and fixed it =)

.

EDIT 2 I got the exact problem... It is a bug in GCC =) The _GLIBCXX_DEBUG compilation flag breaks ABI. You can see discussion on boost bugtracker: https://svn.boost.org/trac/boost/ticket/7666

share|improve this question
    
"In my case there was problem when they both tried to change this storage on creation" - It would be nice to see some code showing that. Possibly, it is bug in Boost - so we should report it. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Nov 4 '13 at 15:47
    
"I replaced boost::thread_specific_ptr from my code with __thread specified variable." - So, the other one TLS slot will be corrupted? =) –  Lazin Nov 4 '13 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+250

I have found several bugs:


Actor::workerThread function does double unlock on d_jobQueueMutex. First unlock is manual d_jobQueueMutex.unlock();, second is in destructor of boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex>.

You should prevent one of unlocking, for example release association between unique_lock and mutex:

g.release(); // <------------ PATCH
d_jobQueueMutex.unlock();

Or add additional code block + default-constructed Job.


It is possible that workerThread will never leave following loop:

while (d_jobQueue.empty()) {
    d_hasJob.wait(g);
}

Imagine following case: d_jobQueue is empty, Actor::~Actor() is called, it sets flag and notifies worker thread:

d_keepWorkerRunning = false;
d_hasJob.notify_one();

workerThread wakes up in while loop, sees that queue is empty and sleeps again.

It is common practice to send special final job to stop worker thread:

~Actor()
{
    execJobSync([this]()->int
    {
        d_keepWorkerRunning = false;
        return 0;
    });
    d_worker.join();
}

In this case, d_keepWorkerRunning is not required to be atomic.


LIVE DEMO on Coliru


EDIT:

I have added event queue code into your example.

You have concurrent queue in both EventQueueImpl and Actor, but for different types. It is possible to extract common part into separate entity concurrent_queue<T> which works for any type. It would be much easier to debug and test queue in one place than catching bugs scattered over different classes.

So, you can try to use this concurrent_queue<T>(on Coliru)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Evgeny. I removed double unlocking (see updated code). But that didn't help =( Still have same weird crash. I noticed that this problem appeared when I added another conditional variable in another class (something like blocking event queue). –  inkooboo Oct 28 '13 at 8:04
    
@inkooboo I have added live demo to bottom of answer - you can try to play with it (maybe add additional parts) in order to reproduce crash. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Oct 28 '13 at 8:12
    
I have added event queue code into your example. coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/1429e27abf63efa1 Unfortunately I can't reproduce crash. But you can look into code and may have some ideas. Thanks. –  inkooboo Oct 28 '13 at 8:39
    
thanks for help. Still can't resolve my problem. Upvoted your other answers on SO. –  inkooboo Oct 28 '13 at 10:17
    
@inkooboo Thanks, see my edit at bottom of answer. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Oct 28 '13 at 10:29

This is just a guess. I think that some code can actually call boost::tread::interrupt(). You can set breakpoint to this function and see what code is responsible for this. You can test for interruption in execJobSync:

int Actor::execJobSync(const Job& job)
{
    if (boost::this_thread::interruption_requested())
        std::cout << "Interruption requested!" << std::endl;
    std::string error;
    boost::promise<int> promise;
    boost::unique_future<int> future = promise.get_future();

The most suspicious code in this case is a code that has reference to thread object.

It is good practice to make your boost::thread code interruption aware anyway. It is also possible to disable interruption for some scope.

If this is not the case - you need to check code that works with thread local storage, because thread interruption flag stored in the TLS. Maybe some your code rewrites it. You can check interruption before and after such code fragment.

Another possibility is that your memory is corrupt. If no code is calling boost::thread::interrupt() and you doesn't work with TLS. This is the most hard case, try to use some dynamic analyzer - valgrind or clang memory sanitizer.

Offtopic: You probably need to use some concurrent queue. std::queue will be very slow because of high memory contention and you will end up with poor cache performance. Good concurrent queue allow your code to enqueue and dequeue elements in parallel.

Also, actor is not something that supposed to execute arbitrary code. Actor queue must receive simple messages, not functions! Youre writing a job queue :) You need to take a look at some actor system like Akka or libcpa.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. After day of debugging I can say that it looks like memory corrution. I set up break to boost::thread::interrupt() and see that nobody ever calls it. In the same time it is a single place where 'interrupt_requested' flag could be set. Currently I'm trying to locate where memory corruption happens. –  inkooboo Oct 29 '13 at 13:49
    
Are you using visual studio? As far as I can remember, it has some macro definition that can check heap consistncy. –  Lazin Oct 29 '13 at 22:39
    
No, it's linux solution. I used valgrind and have detected some 'Invalid writes' from external library. Fortunately I have its source, so it's possible to fix this issue. –  inkooboo Oct 30 '13 at 8:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.