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If i have a simple class like this

class A {
    void private_function();
public:
    void public_function() { /* calls the private function in here */ }
};

Is the compiler required to emit object code for private_function(), or is it allowed to inline all calls to private_function() and to omit private_function from the generated executable?

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marked as duplicate by Benjamin Lindley, larsmans, Suma, Benjamin Bannier, lpapp Mar 1 '14 at 1:25

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2  
Why would it matter what the compiler inlines? Just asking out of curiosity. –  andre Oct 25 '13 at 15:16
    
Can you write a standard-conforming program that can tell the difference? If not, it's allowed. –  Pete Becker Oct 26 '13 at 13:12
    
@Pete: Sure, but since there's an infinite number of standard-conforming programs that behave in intricate and sometimes arcane ways, its hard to give an answer to this question. –  Benno Oct 28 '13 at 16:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is the compiler required to emit object code for private_function()

It will have to if anything uses its address.

or is it allowed to inline all calls to private_function() and to omit private_function from the generated executable?

If nothing uses its address, yes. The program's behaviour would be identical whether or not it generated an unused non-inline version; so by the "as if" rule, it's free not to generate it.

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Could you point me towards the exact definition of odr-used? –  Benno Oct 25 '13 at 15:36
    
@Benno: C++11 3.2/2. Though I may have misused the term here - it's odr-used if you call it, but you only need a non-inline definition if you take its address. –  Mike Seymour Oct 25 '13 at 15:37
    
@MikeSeymour I believe it is perfectly legal to take the address of an inline function, is it not? –  Sam Cristall Oct 25 '13 at 15:52
1  
@SamCristall: It certainly is. If you do, then the compiler will have to generate a non-inline version, so that it has an address. If you don't, then it's free no to. –  Mike Seymour Oct 25 '13 at 15:56
    
Is it possible for code outside of A to take the adress of private_function, or can this only happen within A? –  Benno Oct 25 '13 at 16:17

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