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I do have a credit card number form. The number is divided into four parts just as on a real credit card.

I want to add a JavaScript taste to the form where when a user types four letters in a field, the focus automatically goes to the next tag. But not in the last tag. By doing this, a user doesn't have to type "tab" key to move a focus.

It is okay to add some extra class, id or name in the tags.

<html>
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
    <title>MoveFocus</title>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
     $(function() {
     // some code goes here.
    });
    </script>
</head>


<body>
  <form action="post.php" method="post" accept-charset="utf-8">
    <input type="text" value="" id="first" size="4" maxlength="4"/> -
    <input type="text" value="" id="second" size="4" maxlength="4"/> -
    <input type="text" value="" id="third" size="4" maxlength="4"/> -
    <input type="text" value="" id="fourth" size="4" maxlength="4"/>
    <p><input type="submit" value="Send Credit Card"></p>
  </form>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
3  
... of course some users will press the tab key, and miss fields out. Don't divide the field up, just use a single field. It makes things much easier for users (and is what every other website out there does). –  Quentin Dec 24 '09 at 19:08
5  
Not that I'm every user, but I hate sites that do this with phone, CC and SS numbers. I much prefer sites that interpret the next keypress as going to the next box and typing it. In your case, wait for the fifth keypress, if it's a number, move the focus to the next box and set the first character to the number pressed. If it's a right arrow key, move to the next box and don't set any characters. Just my opinion on usability. –  jball Dec 24 '09 at 19:10
1  
Oh, and if the user makes a mistake entering the last character in any given box, they probably want their backspace key to continue functioning. –  Quentin Dec 24 '09 at 19:13
2  
There needs to be a Coalition Against Auto Focusing and Tabbing.. some these UI are TOO intelligent and get in the way of normal use –  user195488 Dec 24 '09 at 19:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I haven't used this tool before, but it does what you want. You could just look at it's source to get some ideas:

This Plugin on GitHub

For your situation, you would add this code:

<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.autotab.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#first').autotab({ target: '#second', format: 'numeric' });
    $('#second').autotab({ target: '#third', format: 'numeric', previous: '#first' });
    $('#third').autotab({ previous: '#second', format: 'numeric' });
});
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for introducing me to a great plugin. Others suggested use of "onchange()", but it doesn't seem work well. The script you mention use keydown(), keypress() and keyup(), which seem to be a better solution. –  TK. Dec 24 '09 at 20:06

As others have urged, don’t do this. Users are not going to be able to anticipate that you’ll auto-tab them, and this will drive them nuts. Have you thought about users who copy and paste their credit card? What is the benefit of using four fields anyway?

Also, not all credit cards divide their numbers into four sets of four. American Express divides them into three groups of numbers, for example. Dynamically adding and removing text fields is asking for trouble in this case.

Instead, use your Javascript to automatically insert the spaces where they belong, advancing the cursor, not the focus. The first digit in the number indicates the type of credit card (5 is Mastercard, 4 is Visa, 3 is American Express…), so you can read this to decide where to add the spaces. Scrub the spaces out of the string when you post it. This approach will save you and your users a lot of pain.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - autotabbing is the most annoying thing when entering credit card details. Especially if you make a mistake and need to go 'back' –  Patrick Sep 28 '13 at 8:25

As @Sander suggested, the easy way to do an auto-tab is:

jQuery("form input[type=text]").on('input',function () {
    if(jQuery(this).val().length == jQuery(this).attr('maxlength')) {
        jQuery(this).next("input").focus();
    }
});

Update by @morespace54

oninput is an html5 event is supported on IE9+, so you can use keyup instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Just to let you all know that even if the code above is working great on FF/Chrome/Safari/Opera (thanks @Ouadie), I had a hard time making it work in IE (Doh) even on v8. I managed to make it work in IE too by changing input for keyup. So it goes like: jQuery("form input[type=text]").on('keyup',function () { if(jQuery(this).val().length == jQuery(this).attr('maxlength')) { jQuery(this).next("input").focus(); } }); –  morespace54 Feb 18 at 19:49
    
oninput is IE9+, that is why it does not work in IE8 I'll update the solution. Thanks ;) –  Ouadie Feb 18 at 20:46
1  
Oh, I didn't knew about IE9+ using input. Thanks. I wish one day, we live in a world without IE... ;) –  morespace54 Feb 18 at 20:59

I highly recommend using the Masked Input jQuery plugin. http://digitalbush.com/projects/masked-input-plugin/

Your usage will look like this:

$('#creditCardNumber').mask("9999-9999-9999-9999");

This way you'll have copy-paste support.

share|improve this answer

A very simple solution could go like this:

<script type="text/javascript">
    function input_onchange(me){ 
        if (me.value.length != me.maxlength){
            return;
        }
        var i;
        var elements = me.form.elements;
        for (i=0, numElements=elements.length; i<numElements; i++) {
            if (elements[i]==me){
                break;
            }
        }
        elements[i+1].focus();
    }
</script>
<form action="post.php" method="post" accept-charset="utf-8">
    <input type="text" value="" id="first" size="4" maxlength="4"
        onchange="input_onchange(this)"
    /> -
    <input type="text" value="" id="second" size="4" maxlength="4"
        onchange="input_onchange(this)"
    /> -
    <input type="text" value="" id="third" size="4" maxlength="4"
        onchange="input_onchange(this)"
    /> -
    <input type="text" value="" id="fourth" size="4" maxlength="4"
        onchange="input_onchange(this)"
    /> -
    <p><input type="submit" value="Send Credit Card"></p>
</form>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I tried on my browsers (Firefox and Safari), but it doesn't seem to work. –  TK. Dec 24 '09 at 19:57
    
I have changed me.value.length!=this.maxlength to me.value.length!=this.maxLength to make the code work, i guess it was a little typo –  ashofphoenix Sep 10 '13 at 9:50
    
@ashofphoenix: it was, thanks! Corrected in answer. –  Roland Bouman Sep 12 '13 at 11:50

This does not have four fields, but it does validate credit cards (integrity check, not Luhn's Algorithm!). I have to tell you how annoying it is to use multiple fields for a user and auto-tabbing. I recommend you only use one field.

From jquery website:

$("#myform").validate({
  rules: {
    field: {
      required: true,
      creditcard: true
    }
  }
});

/

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" 
                    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
  <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="http://dev.jquery.com/view/trunk/plugins/validate/lib/jquery.delegate.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://dev.jquery.com/view/trunk/plugins/validate/jquery.validate.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
jQuery.validator.setDefaults({
    debug: true,
    success: "valid"
});;
</script>

  <script>
  $(document).ready(function(){
    $("#myform").validate({
  rules: {
    field: {
      required: true,
      creditcard: true
    }
  }
});
  });
  </script>
  <style>#field { margin-left: .5em; float: left; }
    #field, label { float: left; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; }
    br { clear: both; }
    input { border: 1px solid black; margin-bottom: .5em;  }
    input.error { border: 1px solid red; }
    label.error {
    	background: url('http://dev.jquery.com/view/trunk/plugins/validate/demo/images/unchecked.gif') no-repeat;
    	padding-left: 16px;
    	margin-left: .3em;
    }
    label.valid {
    	background: url('http://dev.jquery.com/view/trunk/plugins/validate/demo/images/checked.gif') no-repeat;
    	display: block;
    	width: 16px;
    	height: 16px;
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>

<form id="myform">
  <label for="field">Required, creditcard (try 446-667-651): </label>
  <input class="left" id="field" name="field" />
  <br/>
  <input type="submit" value="Validate!" />
</form>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

I haven't tested it, but I think this will work. It will probably also move the focus to the button when the 4th field is completed.

$("form input").change(function () {
    var maxLength = $(this).attr('maxlength');

    if($(this).val().length == maxLength) {
        $(this).next().focus();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The code doesn't seem to work well. I need to click somewhere after filling 4 letters to move the focus. But thanks. I got the idea. –  TK. Dec 24 '09 at 19:53
    
Ah, that's because change only gets called when the focus moves, which is kind of lame for this example :-).\, you probably need to hook the keyup event instead. –  Sander Rijken Dec 24 '09 at 20:19

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