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I'm currently toying around with passing functions as arguments.

In the program below I use the built-in function EXP as an argument for the integral function. My compiler gives me the following error:

integrate1.f90:22.26:

r = integral(-1.0,1.0,EXP,1000);
                      1
Error: Expected a procedure for argument 'f' at (1)

If I uncomment the usage of EXP on the declaration of the variable r I don't get this error.

So it seems that if I don't use a built-in function I cannot use it as an argument which is kind of weird, cause "built-in" kind of suggests the function is loaded no matter what.

How can I prevent this error without explicitly using the EXP function? Do I need to use the USE statement to load built-in's? If there is no other way around this, I would be interested to know if this is due to the Fortran specification or a compiler issue?

I am using GNU Fortran (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.3-1ubuntu1) 4.7.3.

Example:

MODULE MINTEGRATE
CONTAINS
FUNCTION integral(from,to,f,n)
    INTERFACE
        FUNCTION f(y); REAL, INTENT(IN) :: y; END FUNCTION
    END INTERFACE
    REAL :: from,to,integral,width;
    INTEGER :: n;

    width=ABS(to-from)/n;
    integral = 0.0;
    DO i=0,n
        integral = integral+f(from+width*i)*width;
    END DO
END
END

PROGRAM INTEGRATE
USE MINTEGRATE;

!PROCEDURE(EXP), POINTER :: f => EXP; ! using the variable f below works without error
REAL :: r!=EXP(0.0);
r = integral(-1.0,1.0,EXP,1000);
WRITE(*,*) r;
END
share|improve this question
    
I never did this, but I believe you will have to use procedure pointers. Someone else might have a better idea. –  IRO-bot Oct 25 '13 at 16:01
    
While kinda hackish, you could define your own function myexp that calls EXP. –  Kyle Kanos Oct 25 '13 at 16:09
    
thx iro-bot. the procedure pointer method works without error - i added a comment in the code, but i'll wait for eventual other suggestions before closing –  John Doe Oct 25 '13 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

"When an intrinsic function is passed as an actual argument to a procedure, its specific name must be used, and when called, its arguments must be scalar. Not all specific intrinsic functions can appear as actual arguments. (For more information, see Intrinsic Functions Not Allowed as Actual Arguments)." From Intel Fortran manual.

You were lucky, because the specific name of the generic exp for single precision real is also exp, but otherwise be careful and pass the right specific function, or write own wrapper calling the generic name. For example, if you wanted default real logarithm, you would have to use alog.

You can inform the compiler that you mean the intrisic function exp by:

intrinsic exp

placed among the declarations in the main program.

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