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So I'm making a gem and I've already had great input on it. Unfortunately there's a pretty important bug in it. This gem creates events that you can attach callbacks to, unfortunately, if you have a callback or an event with the same name as one of the class's public_methods, it bugs out. Here's a working example of the gem's bug with some test code underneath it:

# Portion of gem that causes bug
class DemoClass
  def initialize method_symbol
    @method = to_method(method_symbol)
  end

  def call(*args)
    @method.call(*args)
  end

  def some_private_method
    puts 'the private method was called (still bugged)'
  end

  private

  def to_method(method_symbol)
    # this right here references public methods when I don't want it to
    method(method_symbol)
  end
end

# Outside the gem
def some_method
  puts 'this is an original method being called'
end

def some_private_method
  puts 'the private method was NOT called. Bug fixed!'
end

non_bugged_instance = DemoClass.new(:some_method)
bugged_instance = DemoClass.new(:some_private_method)

non_bugged_instance.call
bugged_instance.call

Is there any way to have the private method to_method create method objects with the symbol :add that doesn't refer to the public method add, but instead the method that would be outside of that class?

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closed as too broad by phoet, Undo, MichaC, Ahmed Siouani, Andy Feb 28 '14 at 3:08

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
It seems like the simplest solution here would be to have your to_method and trigger methods quietly rename the callbacks by adding a prefix. – Some Guy Oct 25 '13 at 17:13
    
Sorry about not putting the entire gem in there, but I intend on people being able to edit the callbacks dynamically. So changing the user input isn't much of an option. – Andrew Oct 25 '13 at 17:19
    
Why are you giving the full code? Give us only the code part which made you confused...It will help us to help you out. – Arup Rakshit Oct 25 '13 at 18:36
    
Updated so it only has minimum amount of code to reproduce the problem. The problem only arises when you change the name of the method addme to add and the symbol :addme to :add. It's not really confusing me, I know the problem. I just don't know of any possible solution. – Andrew Oct 25 '13 at 19:53
    
To me it seems by giving a block as the parameter to would be a better choice. But it depends on what you want these code blocks to be like. – iltempo Oct 28 '13 at 23:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

The following code demonstare an example of passing a method deficed in the 'main' into a class via initializer.

class DemoClass
  def initialize method
    @method = method
  end

  def touch *args
    puts 'touch'
    @method.call *args
  end   
end

# Outside the gem
def some_method
  puts 'Unbugged method'
end

def some_private_method
  puts 'Bugged method'
end

non_bugged_instance = DemoClass.new( self.method :some_method )
bugged_instance = DemoClass.new( self.method :some_private_method )

puts "Non bugged touch"
non_bugged_instance.touch

puts "Bugged touch"
bugged_instance.touch

And output:

Non bugged touch
touch
Unbugged method
Bugged touch
touch
Bugged method

If you strongly wish to use only method names replace the class initializer with the following:

def initialize method_name
  @method = Kernel.method method_name
end

And class creation call to as:

non_bugged_instance = DemoClass.new :some_method
bugged_instance = DemoClass.new :some_private_method

But I earnestly advise to use the first option.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with that is that it's extra typing. You're creating a method object and then passing that method through the arguments. I want it to be much more simple than that by a user just having to type DemoClass.new(:some_method). – Andrew Oct 30 '13 at 16:04
    
Please see the additionals. – Малъ Скрылевъ Oct 31 '13 at 5:29
    
Alright, it works and is much better than self.class.superclass.method I just hope it works in the correct scope. – Andrew Oct 31 '13 at 16:47

Okay, so apparently, in order to reference the methods outside of the DemoClass, I needed to use the superclass method. Apparently, you also need to reference self.class or else it will try to call a public method named superclass. All together it will look like this:

# Portion of gem that causes bug
class DemoClass
  def initialize method_symbol
    @method = to_method(method_symbol)
  end

  def call(*args)
    @method.call(*args)
  end

  def some_private_method
    puts 'the private method was called (still bugged)'
  end

  private

  def to_method(method_symbol)
    # this right here references superclass methods like it's supposed to
    self.class.superclass.method(method_symbol)
  end
end

# Outside the gem
def some_method
  puts 'this is an original method being called'
end

def some_private_method
  puts 'the private method was NOT called. Bug fixed!'
end

non_bugged_instance = DemoClass.new(:some_method)
bugged_instance = DemoClass.new(:some_private_method)

non_bugged_instance.call
bugged_instance.call
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