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are there books on designing highly scalable web sites?

(from a programmers perspective)

I read how ebay does it:

Partition by Function, Split Horizontally, Avoid Distributed Transactions, Decouple Functions Asynchronously, Move Processing To Asynchronous Flows, Virtualize At All Levels, Cache Appropriately.

Are these things actually taught or it is so niche that there isn't really any books on these topics?

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Where did you read about that? I would be very interested in whatever resources you're referring to. :) –  Emil H Dec 24 '09 at 19:41
    
IMHO virtualization is for very low traffic applications, and people who can't afford a skilled development and admin team. Once you need to grow horizontally virtualization will kill you. –  Hassan Syed Dec 24 '09 at 19:49
    
@Emil check highscalability.com its on the 1st page. –  mrblah Dec 24 '09 at 19:56

5 Answers 5

The best I've found is

Scalable Internet Architectures

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Much better TOC :P –  Hassan Syed Dec 24 '09 at 19:50

Building Scalable Web Sites has a good reputation.

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I wasn't very impressed. –  Emil H Dec 24 '09 at 19:41
    
The TOC are underwhelming, it looks like any other book about good practises for building a data-driven web-site. –  Hassan Syed Dec 24 '09 at 19:46
1  
I've read it a few times, it's actually quite good. Written by one of Flickr's first engineers, they had to deal with serious scaling issues. –  Ryan Doherty Jul 17 '11 at 7:29

Not sure on books but heres a good reference for Building highly scalable applications

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Web-servers are stateless, web-application are statefull -- this leads to dependance on a data-layer to persist state. Relational databases are often the weakness to hard-core scaleability. For this reason I suggest looking at the research papers and presentations from the nosql community.

Nosql databases provide plug&play expansion, and require programming changes from the web-applications, therefore you will learn a lot about scalability from the material.

You will enough material by scholar.google.com'ing the names of the nosql databases.

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i didn't realize that facebook, linkedin, etc. released their nosql as open source, pretty cool. –  mrblah Dec 24 '09 at 20:07
    
Yeah, its pretty simple technology though at the end of the day, so there is no reason to hold it back. Google has pretty much given away the blue-prints of their architecture as well (research papers). The thing about scale-able design is that it is an art-form -- the underlying primitives are useless without a group of artists to use them :D –  Hassan Syed Dec 24 '09 at 20:14
    
wonder if SO could be built using nosql? –  mrblah Dec 24 '09 at 20:43

I've written an eBook called "Web Scaling vol. 1" for Small Architectures. It has a few interesting examples for caching, splitting database reads/writes, and load-balancing across a pool of web servers. It might be of interest.

http://scalingexperts.com/books

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