Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a server listening on a port
The request is sent from my local client to the server running on my local pc.
Following is my code snippet

remote_len = sizeof(remote_addr);
if ((bytes=recvfrom(sockfd, buf, MAXBUFLEN , 0,
(struct sockaddr *)&remote_addr, &remote_len)) <= 0) {
    exit(1);
}

printf("remote ip = %s\n",inet_ntoa(remote_addr.sin_addr));

When i print the ip i get 0.0.0.0 ??
Is this not the remote IP adrress which i am trying to print?
Edit : Its a TCP socket and i recevied buffer successfully.

share|improve this question
    
What value did recvfrom return? Did it even succeed? What type of socket? Is it connected? etc... –  R.. Oct 25 '13 at 18:31
    
yes it succeeded. Its a TCP socket –  SPB Oct 25 '13 at 18:56
    
What is the value of remote_len? It's possible that you are getting the IPv6 loopback address. –  Bill Lynch Oct 25 '13 at 18:56
    
remote_len is coming 0 –  SPB Oct 25 '13 at 19:15
    
Do you know what address actually connected? –  R.. Oct 25 '13 at 19:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See TCP recvfrom() doesn't store 'from' - apparently it's not supported for TCP. All you're seeing is the zero bytes that were originally there. That's why remote_len returns 0 - because no address was set.

That link is to windows related docs; I don't see that behaviour in the Linux man page, which says only "may be used to receive data on a socket whether or not it is connection-oriented", but at http://www.beej.us/guide/bgnet/output/html/multipage/recvman.html it says that recvfrom is for UDP. It's not mentioned in Harbison + Steele, unfortunately, and I can't find a copy of Unix Network Programming.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks... now i am using getpeername() to get the remote address and also changed recvfrom() to recv() –  SPB Oct 25 '13 at 21:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.