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Here is a short program which is giving me an error I'm having a difficult time understanding:

import time
TIMEOUT_LENGTH = 0.4
TIMEOUT_CHECK = False
STOPPED = True
timeout = 0.0

def start_timer():
    global timeout
    global STOPPED
    global TIMEOUT_CHECK

    TIMEOUT_CHECK = False
    STOPPED = False
    timeout = time.time() + TIMEOUT_LENGTH

def stop_timer():
    global STOPPED
    global TIMEOUT_CHECK

    TIMEOUT_CHECK = False
    STOPPED = True

def timeout():   
    global timeout
    global STOPPED
    global TIMEOUT_CHECK

    currTime = time.time()
    if (currTime > timeout) and (STOPPED == False):
       TIMEOUT_CHECK = True
    return TIMEOUT_CHECK

start_timer()
print timeout()

Running this gives me:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "prob.py", line 34, in <module>
    print timeout()
TypeError: 'float' object is not callable

It doesn't look to me as if I'm trying to call currTime or timeout. What is going on here that I'm not understanding?

share|improve this question
    
I am such a fool. Thanks for the quick responses. –  WhiteHotLoveTiger Oct 25 '13 at 18:45
    
It's exactly the silly mistakes like this that are impossible to spot yourself and easy for others to spot. –  abarnert Oct 25 '13 at 18:54
    
I appreciate that you gave this question a title that is easy to search for so that future users will be able to reference this question. –  SethMMorton Oct 25 '13 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot have both a function and another variable named timeout. Rename one or the other.

As it stands, you first bind timeout to a float value 0.0. You then rebind it by defining a timeout() function. Last but not least, by calling start_timer() you rebind timeout again, back to a float number:

By the time you try to execute print timeout(), timeout is bound to a floating point value and not a function anymore.

share|improve this answer

You make a function named timeout, but then you override that and make timeout a float here:

timeout = time.time() + TIMEOUT_LENGTH

You need to either change the name of the function or the name of the float. They both can't be named timeout.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not a string, it's a float (time() returns a number, and he's adding 0.4 to it—plus, look at the exception text). But otherwise, nice explanation. –  abarnert Oct 25 '13 at 18:44
    
@abarnert - Whoa, that was dumb. Fixed it. :) –  iCodez Oct 25 '13 at 18:45

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