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dateposted is a MySQL TIMESTAMP column:

 SELECT * 
   FROM posts 
  WHERE dateposted > NOW() - 604800

...*SHOULD*, if I am not mistaken, return rows where dateposted was in the last week. But it returns only posts less than roughly one day old. I was under the impression that TIMESTAMP used seconds?

IE: 7 * 3600 * 24 = 604800

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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Use:

WHERE dateposted BETWEEN DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL -7 DAY) AND NOW()
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+1 I would expect this solution to benefit from an index more than the answer I gave. –  Bill Karwin Dec 24 '09 at 22:13
    
Exactumundo! Thank you. I dont know how i got SQL like this to work in my last website. –  Douglas Dec 24 '09 at 22:21

That is because now() is implicitly converted into a number from timestamp and mysql conversion rules create a number like YYYYMMDDHHMMSS.uuuuuu

from mysql docs:

mysql> SELECT NOW();
        -> '2007-12-15 23:50:26'
mysql> SELECT NOW() + 0;
        -> 20071215235026.000000
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FINALLY it makes sense. I was under the impression it changed to the UNIX_TIMESTAMP. thanks. –  Douglas Dec 24 '09 at 22:22
    
Ugh, it really changes the interpretation of the data from underneath you? –  Avery Payne Jun 16 '10 at 18:53

Internally perhaps. The way to do this is the date math functions. So it would be:

SELECT * FROM posts WHERE dateposted > DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL -7 DAY)

I think there is a DATE_SUB, I'm just used to using ADD everywhere.

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No, you can't implicitly use integer arithmetic with TIMESTAMP, DATETIME, and other date-related data types. You're thinking of the UNIX timestamp format, which is an integer number of seconds since 1/1/1970.

You can convert SQL data types to a UNIX timestamp in MySQL and then use arithmetic:

SELECT * FROM posts WHERE UNIX_TIMESTAMP(dateposted)+604800 > NOW()+0;

NB: adding zero to NOW() makes it return a numeric value instead of a string value.


update: Okay, I'm totally wrong with the above query. Converting NOW() to a numeric output doesn't produce a number that can be compared to UNIX timestamps. It produces a number, but the number doesn't count seconds or anything else. The digits are just YYYYMMDDHHMMSS strung together.

Example:

CREATE TABLE foo (
  id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
  dateposted TIMESTAMP
);

INSERT INTO foo (dateposted) VALUES ('2009-12-4'), ('2009-12-11'), ('2009-12-18');

SELECT * FROM foo;

+----+---------------------+
| id | dateposted          |
+----+---------------------+
|  1 | 2009-12-04 00:00:00 |
|  2 | 2009-12-11 00:00:00 |
|  3 | 2009-12-18 00:00:00 |
+----+---------------------+

SELECT *, UNIX_TIMESTAMP(dateposted) AS ut, NOW()-604800 AS wk FROM foo

+----+---------------------+------------+-----------------------+
| id | dateposted          | ut         | wk                    |
+----+---------------------+------------+-----------------------+
|  1 | 2009-12-04 00:00:00 | 1259913600 | 20091223539359.000000 |
|  2 | 2009-12-11 00:00:00 | 1260518400 | 20091223539359.000000 |
|  3 | 2009-12-18 00:00:00 | 1261123200 | 20091223539359.000000 |
+----+---------------------+------------+-----------------------+

It's clear that the numeric values are not comparable. However, UNIX_TIMSTAMP() can also convert numeric values in that format as it can convert a string representation of a timestamp:

SELECT *, UNIX_TIMESTAMP(dateposted) AS ut, UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW())-604800 AS wk FROM foo

+----+---------------------+------------+------------+
| id | dateposted          | ut         | wk         |
+----+---------------------+------------+------------+
|  1 | 2009-12-04 00:00:00 | 1259913600 | 1261089774 |
|  2 | 2009-12-11 00:00:00 | 1260518400 | 1261089774 |
|  3 | 2009-12-18 00:00:00 | 1261123200 | 1261089774 |
+----+---------------------+------------+------------+

Now one can run a query with an expression comparing them:

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE UNIX_TIMESTAMP(dateposted) > UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW())-604800

+----+---------------------+
| id | dateposted          |
+----+---------------------+
|  3 | 2009-12-18 00:00:00 |
+----+---------------------+

But the answer given by @OMGPonies is still better, because this expression in my query probably can't make use of an index. I'm just offering this as an explanation of how the TIMESTAMP and NOW() features work.

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Is there some reason this would be preferred over simply using the date math functions? –  MBCook Dec 24 '09 at 21:59
    
No, I upvoted the answer from @OMGPonies and I would prefer that usage. I show the expression above only because it's more similar to the OP's query. –  Bill Karwin Dec 24 '09 at 22:02
    
+1: For explaining the behavior. –  OMG Ponies Dec 24 '09 at 22:03
    
Then why was it still showing results instead of an error? I am confused. Well the first thing i tried before posting this was to do UNIX_TIMESTAMP(dateposted)> NOW() - 604800, but that (as does yours) returned an empty set. –  Douglas Dec 24 '09 at 22:18
    
@Douglas: I suppose if you are using your original query format then you are supposed to subtract 7000000 (seven million), because this is the way of implicit timestamp conversion (see my answer) –  catwalk Dec 24 '09 at 22:23

Try this query:

SELECT * FROM posts WHERE DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 7 DAY) < dateposted;

I am assuming that you are using mySQL.

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