Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

My goal is to define an injective function f: Int -> Term, where Term is some new sort. Having referred to the definition of the injective function, I wrote the following:

(declare-sort Term)
(declare-fun f (Int) Term)
(assert (forall ((x Int) (y Int))
                (=> (= (f x) (f y)) (= x y))))
(check-sat)

This causes a timeout. I suspect that this is because the solver tries to validate the assertion for all values in the Int domain, which is infinite.

I also checked that the model described above works for some custom sort instead of Int:

(declare-sort Term)
(declare-sort A)
(declare-fun f (A) Term)
(assert (forall ((x A) (y A))
                (=> (= (f x) (f y)) (= x y))))
(declare-const x A)
(declare-const y A)
(assert (and (not (= x y)) (= (f x) (f y))))
(check-sat)
(get-model)

The first question is how to implement the same model for Int sort instead of A. Can solver do this?

I also found the injective function example in the tutorial in multi-patterns section. I don't quite get why :pattern annotation is helpful. So the second question is why :pattern is used and what does it brings to this example particularly.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I am trying this

(declare-sort Term)
(declare-const x Int)
(declare-const y Int)
(declare-fun f (Int) Term)
(define-fun biyect () Bool
    (=> (= (f x) (f y)) (= x y)))
(assert (not biyect))
(check-sat)
(get-model)

and I am obtaining this

sat 
(model 
  ;; universe for Term: 
  ;; Term!val!0 
  ;; ----------- 
  ;; definitions for universe elements: 
  (declare-fun Term!val!0 () Term) 
  ;; cardinality constraint: 
  (forall ((x Term)) (= x Term!val !0)) 
  ;; ----------- 
  (define-fun y () Int 
    1) 
  (define-fun x () Int 
    0) 
  (define-fun f ((x!1 Int)) Term 
    (ite (= x!1 0) Term!val!0 
    (ite (= x!1 1) Term!val!0 
      Term!val!0))) 
  )
share|improve this answer
    
This is not quite right. 1) You are declaring constants before defining the function and the function relies on specific constant values. As you can see in my second example, function is defined for all values in A. 2) The function f in your case is not an injective function. It can be seen from the model. For any input x!1 it will produce the same answer Term!val!0. The function should produce the same answer only for the same arguments. –  Pavel Zaichenkov Oct 26 '13 at 17:29

What do you think about this

(declare-sort Term)
(declare-fun f (Int) Term)
(define-fun biyect () Bool
    (forall ((x Int) (y Int))
            (=> (= (f x) (f y)) (= x y))))
(assert (not biyect))
(check-sat)
(get-model)

and the output is

sat 
(model 
;; universe for Term: 
;; Term!val!0 
;; ----------- 
;; definitions for universe elements: 
(declare-fun Term!val!0 () Term) 
;; cardinality constraint: 
(forall ((x Term)) (= x Term!val!0))
;; ----------- 
(define-fun x!1 () Int 0)
(define-fun y!0 () Int 1) 
(define-fun f ((x!1 Int)) Term 
 (ite (= x!1 0) Term!val!0 
 (ite (= x!1 1) Term!val!0 
   Term!val!0))) 
)
share|improve this answer
    
This is similar to what I wrote. But why do you need (assert (not biyect)) constraint here? Also f function still outputs the same value for two different values (0 and 1), so this is not an injective function, as far as I can see. –  Pavel Zaichenkov Oct 28 '13 at 12:27
    
Yes you are right, when you use (assert (not biyect)) Z3 produces an example of a function which is not injective. The point is that it is not possible to use Z3 with the aim to define an injective function at general. Do you agreee? –  Juan Ospina Oct 28 '13 at 15:19
    
At the moment I don't see any reason why it should be impossible. Also the injective function is provided in the tutorial. I am just trying to figure out is it possible to do for an infinite domain, like Int. –  Pavel Zaichenkov Oct 29 '13 at 13:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.