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Can this be shortened/improved? I'm trying to make a password checker in python.

Could the if's be put into a for loop? And if so, how?

pw = input("Enter password to test: ")

caps = sum(1 for c in pw if c.isupper())
lower = sum(1 for c in pw if c.islower())
nums = sum(1 for c in pw if c.isnumeric())

scr = ['weak', 'medium', 'strong']
r = [caps, lower, nums]


if len(pw) < 6:
    print("too short") 
elif len(pw) > 12:
    print("too long")

if caps >= 1:
    if lower >= 1:
        if nums >= 1:
            print(scr[2])
        elif nums < 1:
            print("your password is " + scr[1])
    elif lower < 1:
        print("your password strength is " + scr[0])
elif caps < 1:
    print("your password strength is " + scr[1])

Thanks for any suggestions :D

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closed as off-topic by abarnert, Mark, Aaron Hall, Maxime Lorant, Fenikso Mar 23 '14 at 19:01

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
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3  
codereview.stackexchange.com is where this should be. the answer to both questions Im sure is yes, it can be both shortened and improved –  Joran Beasley Oct 25 '13 at 21:32
    
The scr[1] is definitely not simpler or more meaningful than 'medium'. (And if you're looking to make your strings localizable… there are better ways to do that.) –  abarnert Oct 25 '13 at 21:35
4  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about reviewing working code. Try Code Review instead. –  abarnert Oct 25 '13 at 21:36
    
@abarnert: I suspect we have differing views on what constitutes "working code" :) –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 25 '13 at 21:39
2  
@TimPietzcker: Well, he's assuming his code is correct and just asking us to simplify it. –  abarnert Oct 25 '13 at 21:43

3 Answers 3

caps = sum(1 for c in pw if c.isupper())

can be:

caps = sum(c.isupper() for c in pw)

if caps >= 1:

can be:

if caps:

The most significant improvement: The bottom if/elif block can be completely removed by doing

i_strength = sum(map(bool,[caps,lower,nums])) - 1 #or sum(map(bool,r)) - 1
print('your password is {}'.format(scr[i_strength]))

Explanation: map(bool,[caps,lower,nums]) accumulates how many times each of caps,lower,nums is non-zero. Adding them up with sum gives you your "strength", which you've conveniently already put into a list, which can be accessed by index.

All of these improvements leverage the concept of "falsiness" in python, otherwise known as an object's value in a boolean context. Generally empty and zero things are False, and summing booleans is equivalent to adding ones and zeroes, so there you go.


Of course, it doesn't seem that you're doing anything with the counts of upper/lower/nums other than checking if they're nonzero. So a cleanup would just be

caps = any(c.isupper() for c in pw)
...

and then

i_strength = sum([caps,lower,nums]) -1
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...and like this the password strength check makes a bit more sense. Well done! –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 25 '13 at 21:42

I would fix that nested if statement.

scr = ['weak', 'medium', 'strong'] # if you want to keep this fine
# but I suggest you do something like this:
_WEAK = scr[0] 
_MEDIUM = scr[1]
_STRONG = scr[2]
if caps >= 1 and lower >= 1 and nums >= 1:
   print(_STRONG)
elif caps < 1:
    print("your password strength is " + _MEDIUM)
elif lower < 1:
   print("your password strength is " + _WEAK)
elif nums < 1:
   print("your password is " + _MEDIUM)
share|improve this answer
    
But that's a different logic. Not that the OP's logic made any sense, but this doesn't either. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 25 '13 at 21:39

I'll ignore the general question, "can this code be shortened or improved", because that's a question for Code Review. But you've also got a specific question in there:

Could the if's be put into a for loop? And if so, how?

They could, but you'd have to turn them into something that can be put inside an iterator, like functions, and I really don't think you want to in this case.

Let's start with a simpler example, with just a linear series of checks:

checks = [
    ((lambda caps, lower, num: caps >= 1 and lower >= 1 and nums >= 1), 2),
    ((lambda caps, lower, num: caps < 1), 1),
    ((lambda caps, lower, num: lower < 1), 0),
    ((lambda caps, lower, num: num < 1), 1)
]
for check, value in checks:
    if check(caps, lower, num):
        print('your password strength is ' + scr[value])
        break

You could instead put the check conditions in some encoded data form, and replace the if check(…) with a data-driven check on the conditions. For example:

checks = [
    ((1, 1, 1), 2),
    ((-1, 0, 0), 1),
    ((0, -1, 0), 0),
    ((0, 0, -1), 1)
]
for check, value in checks:
    for value, condition in zip((caps, lower, num), check):
        if condition == -1 and value >= 1 or condition == 1 and value < 1:
            break
    else:
        print('your password strength is ' + scr[value])
        break

But I think that's even less readable. There are plenty of use cases where this kind of thing makes sense—e.g., imagine you wanted to evaluate 40 polynomials for each value of x; you'd store each polynomial as a list of coefficients, and have generic "evaluate polynomial" logic like this. But this isn't one of those cases.

Either way, that's already pretty ugly. And if you want nested checks, you're going to need a nested structure, which you probably want to process recursively.

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