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I've got a block in my code in which the for loop should run forwards or backwards depending on a condition.

if (forwards) {
    for (unsigned x = 0; x < something.size(); x++ ) {
        // Lots of code
    }

} else {
    for (unsigned x = something.size()-1 ; x >= 0 ; x-- ) {
        // Lots of code
    }
} 

Is there a nice way to set this up, so I don't repeat all the code within the for loop twice?

The 'something' in question is a std::vector<>, so maybe its possible with an iterator? (I'm not using C++11 )

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1  
reverse iterator. –  yngum Oct 25 '13 at 23:26
    
Use while or do-while loop –  Tushar Jadhav Oct 25 '13 at 23:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Separate the loop value from the value you use inside the loop:

for (unsigned x2 = 0; x2 < something.size(); x2++ ) {
    const int x = forward ? x2 : (something.size()-1) - x2;
    // Lots of code using x
}
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I choose this as the answer as a) I used it and b) it most directly solved the question I posed. I like the other answers too. Many ways to skin a cat! –  joeButler Oct 26 '13 at 0:04
    
You've moved the conditional from outside the loop to inside--functional but certainly not optimal if this is performance critical code. On the other hand, since you say "lots of code", it's unlikely that the conditional will add a significant burden...and branch prediction will be working in your favor. –  Drew Hall Oct 26 '13 at 4:51
    
Yeah, I agree with that. But I guess there will always be either a conditional to evaluate or a function call. In my 'real' code, there's an inner loop which is doing the heavy lifting so I would have been happy to go with either route the vast majority of time is spent there. –  joeButler Oct 26 '13 at 8:40
    
The function call should be "free" after the first time since you'll have a hot instruction cache--but then again as I said before, so should the conditional due to branch prediction. This is a slightly cleaner solution for sure. –  Drew Hall Oct 29 '13 at 1:07

Probably the easiest way is to convert Lots of code to a function with argument x and replace both loop bodies with a call to that function:

void do_lots_of_stuff(unsigned x) {
  // Lots of code
}

////////

if (forwards) {
  for (unsigned x = 0; x < something.size(); x++ ) {
    do_lots_of_stuff(x);
  }
} else {
  for (unsigned x = something.size()-1 ; x >= 0 ; x-- ) {
    do_lots_of_stuff(x);
  }
}
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template<typename Cont, typename Func>
Func directional_for_each(Cont c, bool forwards, Func f) {
    return forwards ? for_each(begin(c), end(c), f) : for_each(rbegin(c), rend(c), f);
}

Used like this:

vector<int> v;
// put stuff in v...
bool forwards = false;
directional_for_each(v, forwards, [](decltype(v[0]) x) {
    // Lots of code using x
});

As you're not using C++11 the lambda containing 'Lots of code using x' would have to be replaced with a function defined elsewhere.

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Or you can do something like this:

for (unsigned x = (forward ? 0: something.size()); x != (forward ? something.size() :0); forward? x++: x-- ) {
    // Lots of code
}

The compiler will most likely optimize it and evaluate forward only once since it's value doesn't change in the for loop I assume.

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