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I have a form with name orderproductForm and an undefined number of inputs.

I want to do some kind of jQuery.get or ajax or anything like that that would call a page through Ajax, and send along all the inputs of the form orderproductForm.

I suppose one way would be to do something like

jQuery.get("myurl",
          {action : document.orderproductForm.action.value,
           cartproductid : document.orderproductForm.cartproductid.value,
           productid : document.orderproductForm.productid.value,
           ...

However I do not know exactly all the form inputs. Is there a feature, function or something that would just send ALL the form inputs?

Thanks

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9 Answers 9

up vote 284 down vote accepted

You can use the ajaxForm/ajaxSubmit functions from Ajax Form Plugin or the jQuery serialize function.

AjaxForm:

$("#theForm").ajaxForm({url: 'server.php', type: 'post'})

or

$("#theForm").ajaxSubmit({url: 'server.php', type: 'post'})

ajaxForm will send when the submit button is pressed. ajaxSubmit sends immediately.

Serialize:

$.get('server.php?' + $('#theForm').serialize())

$.post('server.php', $('#theform').serialize())

AJAX serialization documentation is here.

share|improve this answer
1  
interesting idea, however, i do not control the server side I am calling, therefore I cannot send it serialized data –  Nathan H Dec 25 '09 at 1:45
14  
Yes you can, the name isn't important what it will do is send pairs of every form-key and every form-variable. –  Steve Kemp Dec 25 '09 at 1:50
4  
It's serialized into a query string, just like the data you are putting into the array manually in the GET call there would be. This is what you want, I'm pretty sure. –  JAL Dec 25 '09 at 1:50
1  
oooh I see, I then add this string to the end of the URL in the get call. I was thinking PHP serialize. Sorry. Thanks! –  Nathan H Dec 25 '09 at 1:56
102  
.ajaxSubmit()/.ajaxForm() are not core jQuery functions- you need the jQuery Form Plugin –  Yarin Jun 5 '12 at 2:58

This is a simple reference:

// this is the id of the form
$("#idForm").submit(function() {

    var url = "path/to/your/script.php"; // the script where you handle the form input.

    $.ajax({
           type: "POST",
           url: url,
           data: $("#idForm").serialize(), // serializes the form's elements.
           success: function(data)
           {
               alert(data); // show response from the php script.
           }
         });

    return false; // avoid to execute the actual submit of the form.
});

I hope it helps you.

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12  
But form.serialize() can't post <input type="file"> in IE –  macio.Jun Jan 19 '13 at 19:25
1  
Great answer for normal form submission! –  The Sheek Geek Feb 4 '13 at 21:36
45  
It's better to put this inside $("#idForm").submit(...) rather than $("#submitButtonId").click(...) –  Renato Feb 12 '13 at 12:54
22  
Instead of return false you should be using e.preventDefault() to allow further event propagation after your click handler is complete. Using e.preventDefault() will only stop the default action of the Submit button (e.g. to submit the form) but will allow any other events bound to that form to execute. See: fuelyourcoding.com/jquery-events-stop-misusing-return-false –  John Kary Jun 3 '13 at 8:06
6  
Instead of specifying the url to your script here you could just use the forms ACTION attribute which is normally specified: var url = $(this).attr('action'); –  Bjørn Børresen Dec 17 '13 at 19:36

Another similar solution using attributes defined on the form element:

<form id="contactForm1" action="/your_url" method="post">
    ...
</form>

<script type="text/javascript">
    var frm = $('#contactForm1');
    frm.submit(function (ev) {
        $.ajax({
            type: frm.attr('method'),
            url: frm.attr('action'),
            data: frm.serialize(),
            success: function (data) {
                alert('ok');
            }
        });

        ev.preventDefault();
    });
</script>
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9  
Very generic, and reusable, +1 –  fguillen Mar 8 '13 at 14:37
5  
This is a better solution, since it pulls the url and method from the form itself. I'd prefer it if it wasn't presented as inline JavaScript though. –  superluminary May 7 '13 at 12:09
4  
Also, return false should be event.preventDefault(); –  superluminary May 7 '13 at 12:10
1  
@superluminary Your are right, I have fixed the answer. –  Davide Icardi Oct 4 '13 at 7:42
1  
Nice, this solves the problem and is better than the accepted answer :) –  superluminary Oct 9 '13 at 12:13

There are a few things you need to bear in mind.

1. There are several ways to submit a form

  • using the submit button
  • by pressing enter
  • by triggering a submit event in JavaScript
  • possibly more depending on the device or future device.

We should therefore bind to the form submit event, not the button click event. This will ensure our code works on all devices and assistive technologies now and in the future.

2. Hijax

The user may not have JavaScript enabled. A hijax pattern is good here, where we gently take control of the form using JavaScript, but leave it submittable if JavaScript fails.

We should pull the URL and method from the form, so if the HTML changes, we don't need to update the JavaScript.

3. Unobtrusive JavaScript

Using event.preventDefault() instead of return false is good practice as it allows the event to bubble up. This lets other scripts tie into the event, for example analytics scripts which may be monitoring user interactions.

Script should properly be linked to in the head section of the page, and enhance the user experience, not get in the way.

Code

Assuming you agree with all the above, and you want to catch the submit event, and handle it via AJAX (a hijax pattern), you could do something like this:

$(function() {
  $('form.my_form').submit(function(event) {
    var form = $(this);
    $.ajax({
      type: form.attr('method'),
      url: form.attr('action'),
      data: form.serialize()
    }).done(function() {
      // Optionally alert the user of success here...
    }).fail(function() {
      // Optionally alert the user of an error here...
    });
    event.preventDefault(); // Prevent the form from submitting via the browser.
  });
});

You can manually trigger a form submission whenever you like via JavaScript using something like:

$(function() {
  $('form.my_form').trigger('submit');
});

Edit:

I recently had to do this and ended up writing a plugin.

(function($) {
  $.fn.autosubmit = function() {
    this.submit(function(event) {
      var form = $(this);
      $.ajax({
        type: form.attr('method'),
        url: form.attr('action'),
        data: form.serialize()
      }).done(function() {
        // Optionally alert the user of success here...
      }).fail(function() {
        // Optionally alert the user of an error here...
      });
      event.preventDefault();
    });
  }
})(jQuery)

Add a data-autosubmit attribute to your form tag and you can then do this:

$(function() {
  $('form[data-autosubmit]').autosubmit();
});
share|improve this answer
3  
Awesome response, thorough and expresses proper practice. +1 –  ug_ Aug 1 '13 at 18:18
1  
hijax pattern, nice ! –  The Demz Aug 7 '13 at 14:54
    
Thanks, you're too kind :) –  superluminary Sep 6 '13 at 21:37
    
how can I add the callbacks to 'done' and 'fail' functions? something like $('form[data-autosubmit]').autosubmit().done(function({ ... }); This is possible? –  Crusader Feb 17 at 1:54

You can also use FormData (But not available in IE):

var formData = new FormData(document.getElementsByName('yourForm')[0]);// yourForm: form selector        
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "yourURL",// where you wanna post
                data: formData,
                processData: false,
                contentType: false,
                error: function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorMessage) {
                   console.log(errorMessage); // Optional
                },
                success: function(data) {console.log(data)} 
            });

How to use FormData: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/XMLHttpRequest/FormData/Using_FormData_Objects

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answers +1 –  Lalit May 7 '13 at 10:47
3  
I see FormData is now supported by IE10. In a few years this will be the preferred solution. –  superluminary May 8 '13 at 10:09
1  
What advantage of this way? –  insign Aug 23 '13 at 18:00

Copy and paste ajaxification of a form or all forms on a page

It is a modified version of Alfrekjv's answer

  • It will work with jQuery >= 1.3.2
  • You can run this before the document is ready
  • You can remove and re-add the form and it will still work
  • It will post to the same location as the normal form, specified in the form's "action" attribute

JavaScript

jQuery(document).submit(function(e){
    var form = jQuery(e.target);
    if(form.is("#form-id")){ // check if this is the form that you want (delete this check to apply this to all forms)
        e.preventDefault();
        jQuery.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: form.attr("action"), 
            data: form.serialize(), // serializes the form's elements.
            success: function(data) {
                console.log(data); // show response from the php script. (use the developer toolbar console, firefox firebug or chrome inspector console)
            }
        });
    }
});

I wanted to edit Alfrekjv's answer but deviated too much from it so decided to post this as a separate answer.

Not tested with files

Does not support buttons, for example clicking a button (including a submit button) sends its value as form data, but because this is an ajax request the button click will not be sent.

To support buttons you can capture the actual button click instead of the submit.

jQuery(document).click(function(e){
    var self = jQuery(e.target);
    if(self.is("#form-id input[type=submit], #form-id input[type=button], #form-id button")){
        e.preventDefault();
        var form = self.closest('form'), formdata = form.serialize();
        //add the clicked button to the form data
        if(self.attr('name')){
            formdata += (formdata!=='')? '&':'';
            formdata += self.attr('name') + '=' + ((self.is('button'))? self.html(): self.val());
        }
        jQuery.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: form.attr("action"), 
            data: formdata, 
            success: function(data) {
                console.log(data);
            }
        });
    }
});

On the server side you can detect an ajax request with this header that jquery sets HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH for php

PHP

if(!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH']) && strtolower($_SERVER['HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH']) == 'xmlhttprequest') {
    //is ajax
}
share|improve this answer

I really liked this answer by superluminary and especially the way he wrapped is solution in a jQuery plugin. So thanks to superluminary for a very useful answer. In my case, though, I wanted a plugin that would allow me to define the success and error event handlers by means of options when the plugin is initialized.

So here is what I came up with:

;(function(defaults, $, undefined) {
    var getSubmitHandler = function(onsubmit, success, error) {
        return function(event) {
            if (typeof onsubmit === 'function') {
                onsubmit.call(this, event);
            }
            var form = $(this);
            $.ajax({
                type: form.attr('method'),
                url: form.attr('action'),
                data: form.serialize()
            }).done(function() {
                if (typeof success === 'function') {
                    success.apply(this, arguments);
                }
            }).fail(function() {
                if (typeof error === 'function') {
                    error.apply(this, arguments);
                }
            });
            event.preventDefault();
        };
    };
    $.fn.extend({
        // Usage:
        // jQuery(selector).ajaxForm({ 
        //                              onsubmit:function() {},
        //                              success:function() {}, 
        //                              error: function() {} 
        //                           });
        ajaxForm : function(options) {
            options = $.extend({}, defaults, options);
            return $(this).each(function() {
                $(this).submit(getSubmitHandler(options['onsubmit'], options['success'], options['error']));
            });
        }
    });
})({}, jQuery);

This plugin allows me to very easily "ajaxify" html forms on the page and provide onsubmit, success and error event handlers for implementing feedback to the user of the status of the form submit. This allowed the plugin to be used as follows:

 $('form').ajaxForm({
      onsubmit: function(event) {
          // User submitted the form
      },
      success: function(data, textStatus, jqXHR) {
          // The form was successfully submitted
      },
      error: function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
          // The submit action failed
      }
 });

Note that the success and error event handlers receive the same arguments that you would receive from the corresponding events of the jQuery ajax method.

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I got the following for me:

formSubmit('#login-form', '/api/user/login', '/members/');

where

function formSubmit(form, url, target) {
    $(form).submit(function(event) {
        $.post(url, $(form).serialize())
            .done(function(res) {
                if (res.success) {
                    window.location = target;
                }
                else {
                    alert(res.error);
                }
            })
            .fail(function(res) {
                alert("Server Error: " + res.status + " " + res.statusText);

            })
        event.preventDefault();
    });
}

This assumes the post to 'url' returns an ajax in the form of {success: false, error:'my Error to display'}

You can vary this as you like. Feel free to use that snippet.

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There's also the submit event, which can be triggered like this $("#form_id").submit(). You'd use this method if the form is well represented in HTML already. You'd just read in the page, populate the form inputs with stuff, then call .submit(). It'll use the method and action defined in the form's declaration, so you don't need to copy it into your javascript.

examples

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28  
if you delete your post, you get the penalty points that have been taken away from you back. –  Spider Dec 20 '12 at 7:20
    
This will submit the form, but not via AJAX, so doesn't answer the question. –  superluminary May 8 '13 at 10:11
1  
what @spider said, plus you get a nice badge called "peer pressure" –  nurettin Mar 19 at 14:30

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