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I have the following struct:

 public struct UserProp<T>
{
    private T val;
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            return (T) this.val;
        }
        set
        {
            this.val= value;
            this.IsSet = true;
        }
    }

    public bool IsSet;


}

and a class that uses it:

public class MyClass
{
     private UserProp<string> FirstName;
     private UserProp<int> ID;
     ....
}

How can I get all of the fields of the object where IsSet is true? I was going to use reflection and cast the GetField value as a UserProp, but I wouldn't know the type for the generic. Essentially what I am looking for is: get all fields of MyClass of type UserProp (regardless of generic type) where IsSet is true.

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1  
I have to point out that you have a recursive property in that class there. It will likely cause a StackOverflowException.. –  Simon Whitehead Oct 26 '13 at 5:36
    
Thanks, the real object has firstname, lastname, etc. I was just trying to be concise. Thanks for pointing it out though, I fixed it. –  Mike Oct 26 '13 at 5:39
    
No, that's incorrect. Setting this.Value in the setter for Value will cause it to go into an infinite loop. You need a private backing field for it. –  Simon Whitehead Oct 26 '13 at 5:45
1  
Thanks for catching that Simon, saved me a bunch of debug time later on. –  Mike Oct 26 '13 at 5:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

but I wouldn't know the type for the generic

You don't need to know what T is. Use the open generic type. Here's a hopefully correct example:

var myClass = new MyClass();

foreach (var fieldInfo in myClass.GetType().GetFields(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance))
{
    var fieldType = fieldInfo.FieldType;

    if (!fieldType.IsGenericType ||
        fieldType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() != typeof (UserProp<>))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Ignoring {0} {1}", fieldType.Name, fieldInfo.Name);
        continue;
    }

    var fieldValue1 = fieldInfo.GetValue(myClass);
    var fieldInfo2 = fieldValue1.GetType().GetField("IsSet");
    var fieldValue2 = fieldInfo2.GetValue(fieldValue1);

    Console.WriteLine("{0}.IsSet has a value of {1}", fieldInfo.Name, fieldValue2);

    // You can check fieldValue2 and if true you now have "[a field] of
    // MyClass of type UserProp (regardless of generic type) where IsSet
    // is true". Loop until you get them all!
}

Given this definition of MyClass:

public class MyClass
{
    private int z;
    private UserProp<string> FirstName;
    private UserProp<int> ID;

    public MyClass()
    {
        ID.Value = 5;
    }
}

Would yield this result:

Ignoring Int32 z
FirstName.IsSet has a value of False
ID.IsSet has a value of True
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1  
+1 note that if UserProp is struct this code forces boxing on each access to the field. As usual reflection can be cached or even converted into Expression and compiled if it is found that the code is slow. –  Alexei Levenkov Oct 26 '13 at 18:11
    
@AlexeiLevenkov +1 I must confess that I read your first sentence in my head and thought "duh, that's unavoidable" but you're quite right about the compiled expressions. –  ta.speot.is Oct 27 '13 at 0:24

Unless you have extremely good reasons to use struct consider switching to class for your UserProp. Than you can have base class to use for shared properties:

public class UserProp
{
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public bool IsSet { get; set; }
}

public class UserProp<T> : UserProp
{
   private T val;
   public T Value...
}

This way you'll only need to reflect over fields and check for known UserProp type and value will be available with direct access after cast (instead of one more reflection to get value by name).

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1  
Than you can have base class to use for shared properties structs can implement interfaces. Just put an interface on it. –  ta.speot.is Oct 26 '13 at 7:08
    
@ta.speot.is - good point - interface is an option if OP wants to stick with struct. I'd personally avoid struct (especially mutable one as in OP's case) due to the fact it is value type and normally confuses everyone who tries to access/change value of such type. I'm afraid code that changes this struct-wrapped properties must be reviewed very carefully to avoid modifying copy of the field instead of original one... –  Alexei Levenkov Oct 26 '13 at 7:13
    
Thanks Alexei, I used a struct because I am dealing with 1000s of employee objects in active memory at a time (each with about 40 properties (that would be structs)) and I thought the benefit of having the values on the stack rather than the heap would improve performance. –  Mike Oct 26 '13 at 17:00
    
@Mike - I'd strongly recommend to measure instead of "thought" to make performance decisions. I.e. you are ok with reflection which means you are boxing your structs on every access to IsSet which forces creation of new object on the heap each time... –  Alexei Levenkov Oct 26 '13 at 18:07
    
@Mike I thought the benefit of having the values on the stack rather than the heap would improve performance Lulwat –  ta.speot.is Oct 27 '13 at 0:10

This should work if you don't mind using the dynamic keyword:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyClass myclass = new MyClass();
        var type = myclass.GetType();
        var fields = type.GetFields().Where(x => x.FieldType != null && x.FieldType.Name == "UserProp`1");

        foreach (var item in fields)
        {
            dynamic userProp = item.GetValue(myclass);
            Console.WriteLine(userProp.IsSet);
        }

        myclass.FirstName.Value = "Mark";

        foreach (var item in fields)
        {
            dynamic userProp = item.GetValue(myclass);
            Console.WriteLine(userProp.IsSet);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
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