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I'm learning Rust and it looks very interesting. I'm not yet very familiar with "match", but it looks to be fairly integral. I was using the following code (below) to convert String to i64 which included the commented-out line "None" in place of the next line "_". I wondered what happened in the event of a non-match without underscore or whether "None" may be a catch-all. The calling-code requires a positive i64, so negative results in an invalid input (in this case). I'm not sure if it's possible to indicate an error in a return using this example other than perhaps using a struct.

  1. Without underscore as a match item, will "None" catch all, and can it be used instead of underscore?

  2. Is it possible to return an error in a function like this without using a struct as the return value?

  3. In general, is it possible for a non-match using "match" and if so, what happens?

  4. In the example below, is there any difference between using underscore and using "None"?

Example code :

fn fParseI64(sVal: &str) -> i64 {
    match from_str::<i64>(sVal) {
        Some(iVal) => iVal,
//        None => -1
     _ => -1    
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. Without underscore as a match item, will "None" catch all, and can it be used instead of underscore?

In this case, yes. There are only 2 cases for Option<T>: Some<T> or None. You are already matching the Some case for all values, None is the only case that's left, so None will behave exactly the same as _.

 2. Is it possible to return an error in a function like this without using a struct as the return value?

I'd suggest you read this detailed guide to understand all the possible ways to handle errors - http://static.rust-lang.org/doc/master/tutorial-conditions.html

Using Options and Results will require you to return a struct.

 3. In general, is it possible for a non-match using "match" and if so, what happens?

Rust won't compile a match if it can't guarantee that all the possible cases are handled. You'll need to have a _ clause if you are not matching all possibilities.

 4. In the example below, is there any difference between using underscore and using "None"?

No. See Answer #1.

Here are 3 of the many ways you can write your function:

// Returns -1 on wrong input.
fn alt_1(s: &str) -> i64 {
  match from_str::<i64>(s) {
    Some(i) => if i >= 0 {
      i
    } else {
      -1
    },
    None => -1
  }
}

// Returns None on invalid input.
fn alt_2(s: &str) -> Option<i64> {
  match from_str::<i64>(s) {
    Some(i) => if i >= 0 {
      Some(i)
    } else {
      None
    },
    None => None
  }
}

// Returns a nice message describing the problem with the input, if any.
fn alt_3(s: &str) -> Result<i64, ~str> {
  match from_str::<i64>(s) {
    Some(i) => if i >= 0 {
      Ok(i)
    } else {
      Err(~"It's less than 0!")
    },
    None => Err(~"It's not even a valid integer!")
  }
}

fn main() {
  println!("{:?}", alt_1("123"));
  println!("{:?}", alt_1("-123"));
  println!("{:?}", alt_1("abc"));

  println!("{:?}", alt_2("123"));
  println!("{:?}", alt_2("-123"));
  println!("{:?}", alt_2("abc"));

  println!("{:?}", alt_3("123"));
  println!("{:?}", alt_3("-123"));
  println!("{:?}", alt_3("abc"));
}

Output:

123i64
-1i64
-1i64
Some(123i64)
None
None
Ok(123i64)
Err(~"It's less than 0!")
Err(~"It's not even a valid integer!")
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Thanks, that looks very explanatory. I'll try the examples given. –  Brian Oh Oct 26 '13 at 12:55

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