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Actually in my asp.net application using FormAuthentication Cookie, and set the authenticationCookie expire as 30 days, but in IIS Forms Authentication settings its default 30 minutes.

My question is which time-out expires first?, actually I need long time Authentication Cookie expiration.

here is the code which I use to set the authenticationCookie time out.

        if (UserValidation(tbuser.Text, tbpass.Text))
        {
            Response.Cookies.Clear();
            DateTime expiryDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(30);
            FormsAuthenticationTicket ticket = new FormsAuthenticationTicket(2, tbuser.Text, DateTime.Now, expiryDate, true, String.Empty);
            string encryptedTicket = FormsAuthentication.Encrypt(ticket);
            HttpCookie authenticationCookie = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, encryptedTicket);
            authenticationCookie.Expires = ticket.Expiration;
            Response.Cookies.Add(authenticationCookie);                
            //FormsAuthentication.RedirectFromLoginPage(tbuser.Text, false);
            Response.Redirect("Home.aspx");
        }
share|improve this question

The cookie will expire based on the settings in your application - i.e. 30 days.

If you don't specify anything in your application's web.config or in code, you'll inherit default values, but that's not the case here.

share|improve this answer
    
so you mean, in this case, the authentication cookie will expire as per my code, i.e, 30 days, right? I don't want to set anything on IIS, right? – Able Alias Oct 26 '13 at 14:32
    
That's right. You don't need to set anything on IIS – Joe Oct 26 '13 at 21:52
    
Thanks a lot... – Able Alias Oct 27 '13 at 9:06

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