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I have to overload '+' operator for two dynamic containers.

Occurance Occurance::operator +(const Occurance& occ) const {
    Occurance* result = new Occurance;
    Iterator i1(head);
    Iterator i2(occ.head);
    while( !(i1.isNULL() && i2.isNULL()) ) {
        if(i1.getCount() >= i2.getCount()) {
            result->add(i1.getFile());
            result->tail->count = i1.getCount();
            ++i1;
        }
        else {
            result->add(i2.getFile());
            result->tail->count = i2.getCount();
            ++i2;
        }
    }
    return *result;
}

When I do:

Occurance occ = occ1+occ2;

Pointers to the begin of the list are copied correctly and everything works fine but I'm losing reference to result. When occ destructor is called whole list is destroyed, but not the first element of result as I have simply copied it's content instead of reference.

When I change return type to reference the same occurs but during assignment.

Another idea is to not create the 'result' dynamically, so it's automaticly destroyed at the end of function, but then it's calling the destructor which is destroying whole list.

Is there any simple and "proper" way to create such structure and return it without this memory leak? And of course the returned type must be the object or reference as it is expected from '+' operator.

I have figured out a nasty hack involving changing pointer to function in the destructor, but maybe I'm just missing something very simple?

Edit: Of course class follows the rule of three. Here is assignment:

Occurance& Occurance::operator =(const Occurance& occ) {
    destruct();
    head = occ.head;
    current = occ.current;
    tail = occ.tail;
    return *this;
}

Occurance::Occurance(const Occurance& occ) {
    head = occ.head;
    current = occ.current;
    tail = occ.tail;
}

Occurance::~Occurance() {
    destruct();
}

destruct just destroys the list that starts at 'head'.

The class declaration:

class Occurance {
private:
    class Node {
    public:
        Node* next;
        Node* prev;
        int count;
        const File* file;

        Node(const File& a_file, Node* a_prev);
    };

    Node* head;
    Node* tail;
    Node* current;
    void destruct();
public:
    class Iterator {
    private:
        Node* node;
    public:
        Iterator();
        Iterator(Node* a_node);
        void operator ++();
        const File& getFile();
        int getCount();
        bool isNULL();
    };

    Occurance();
    Occurance(const Occurance& occ);
    void add(const File& a_file);
    Occurance& operator =(const Occurance& occ);
    Occurance operator +(const Occurance& occ) const;   //dodaje listy zachowując sortowanie
    Iterator begin() const;
    virtual ~Occurance();
};
share|improve this question
    
Does your class follow The Rule of Three? If not, it needs to. If so, what do your copy constructor and assignment operator look like? –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 26 '13 at 13:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your copy constructor and assignment operator are broken. You either need to do a deep copy of your list, or you need to implement some kind of sharing semantics (e.g. reference counting). You appear to have a linked list, and you are simply copying the head and tail pointers. So when you make a copy, and one is destroyed, it destroys the other one's list too.

I assume your default constructor and/or your add function does some dynamic allocation of nodes. Then your copy constructor and assignment operator need to dynamically allocate nodes too, which are completely independent of the nodes of the object which is being copied. If C++11 is available to you, you should also consider implementing a move constructor, and a move assignment operator.

Once those functions are all correct, your operator+ should look something like this:

Occurance Occurance::operator +(const Occurance& occ) const {
    Occurance result; // no dynamic allocation

    // operate on result

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think I must overthink my desing. You're right. No one will assume that when he do a = b, and then destroy one of them the second is broken. It's just so tough that I'm allocating this list from scratch just to allocate it again during assignment. –  pkubik Oct 26 '13 at 14:10
    
@pkubik: Are you doing this for educational purposes? If not, then why not just use std::list from the standard library? Then you don't have to worry about The Rule of Three/Five, as the list takes care of its own copying and destruction. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 26 '13 at 14:14
    
For educational purposes. In the first project we musn't use STL collections. Yet we must create this '+' operator. Right now it seems quite obvious why it isn't implemented in STL containers. –  pkubik Oct 26 '13 at 14:36

Another idea is to not create the 'result' dynamically, so it's automaticly destroyed at the end of function, but then it's calling the destructor which is destroying whole list.

You should read about copy constructor. Before the returning object's destructor is called, the copy constructor is called that copies the data from that object to the temporary object that will hold the result of occ1+occ2 operation. I assume you have members that point to dynamically allocated data and in this case, when the copy constructor is called, it assigns the pointer to the temp object instead of allocate new memory and copy data. You must code it on your own. I'd advise you to read: http://www.cplusplus.com/articles/y8hv0pDG/

Also note that you should overload operator = in the same manner if you want to perform this assignment

occ = occ1+occ2

edit: Sorry, I can't comment, could you also copy your class declaration?

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In C++, the general principle is to return copies on the stack, not objects allocated on the heap. So in this case you would simply do:

Occurance Occurance::operator +(const Occurance& occ) const 
{
    Occurance result;
    // do whatever
    return result; 
}

and call it:

Occurance occ = occ1+occ2;

The compiler is smart enough to understand not to make a copy but to re-use the object that you're returning into (this is called return-value optimisation or RVO).

If you really need the object to be the exact same object created inside your function for whatever reason, then you can either: return a smart pointer (look up shared_ptr) or use the new C++11 move operator.

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