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I have got a class which has two strings fields. Either of them (but not both) can be null.

public class SimpleBluetoothDevice {

    final String macAddress;
    final String name;

    public SimpleBluetoothDevice(String name, String macAddress) {
        this.macAddress = macAddress;
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (o == this) {
            return true;
        }
        if (!(o instanceof SimpleBluetoothDevice)) {
            return false;
        }
        SimpleBluetoothDevice otherDevice = (SimpleBluetoothDevice) o;
        if (name == null || otherDevice.name == null) { 
            return otherDevice.macAddress.equalsIgnoreCase(macAddress);
        }
        if (macAddress == null || otherDevice.macAddress == null) { 
            return otherDevice.name.equals(name);
        }
        return name.equals(otherDevice.name) || macAddress.equalsIgnoreCase(otherDevice.macAddress);
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        int hash = 1;
        hash = 31 * hash + ((name == null) ? 0 : name.hashCode());
        hash = 31 * hash + ((macAddress == null) ? 0 : macAddress.toLowerCase(Locale.US).hashCode());
        return hash;
    } }

Testing

public class Main {

    private static final List<SimpleBluetoothDevice> DEVICE_LIST = new ArrayList<SimpleBluetoothDevice>();
    private static final Set<SimpleBluetoothDevice> DEVICE_SET = new HashSet<SimpleBluetoothDevice>();

    static {
        DEVICE_LIST.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice(null, "11-22-33-44-55-aa"));
        DEVICE_LIST.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice("iPad", "11-22-33-44-55-BB"));

        DEVICE_SET.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice(null, "11-22-33-44-55-aa"));
        DEVICE_SET.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice("iPad", "11-22-33-44-55-BB"));
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SimpleBluetoothDevice bluetoothDevice = new SimpleBluetoothDevice("Android", "11-22-33-44-55-AA");
        System.out.println(DEVICE_LIST.contains(bluetoothDevice)); // TRUE
        System.out.println(DEVICE_SET.contains(bluetoothDevice)); // FALSE
    }

}

The Set really contains bluetoothDevice, but a false value was returned because of incorrectly implemented hashCode().

Is it possible to implement hashCode here to use hash-based collections? Two devices will be equal if their MAC addresses or names are equal (or the MAC addresses and the names are equal respectively).

Update #1.

public class Main {

    private static final List<SimpleBluetoothDevice> BLUETOOTH_DEVICES = new ArrayList<SimpleBluetoothDevice>();

    static {
        BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice(null, "38:ec:e4:d7:ad:a2"));
        BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice("Nokia N9", "40:98:4E:48:1D:B0"));
        BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice("Galaxy S4", "08:FC:88:AD:4A:62"));
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SimpleBluetoothDevice one = new SimpleBluetoothDevice(null, "38:ec:e4:d7:ad:a2");
        SimpleBluetoothDevice two = new SimpleBluetoothDevice("GT-I9003", "38:ec:e4:d7:ad:a2");
        SimpleBluetoothDevice three = new SimpleBluetoothDevice("GT-I9003", "123");
        System.out.println(one.equals(two));
        System.out.println(two.equals(three));
        System.out.println("Transitivity test. " + one.equals(three));
        System.out.println("Contains test. " + BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.contains(one));
        System.out.println("Contains test. " + BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.contains(two));
        System.out.println("Contains test. " + BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.contains(three));
    }

    /**
     * This class only contains two text fields: MAC address and name.
     * 
     * @author Maxim Dmitriev
     * 
     */
    private static final class SimpleBluetoothDevice {

        final String macAddress;
        final String name;

        SimpleBluetoothDevice(String name, String macAddress) {
            this.macAddress = macAddress;
            this.name = name;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Name: " + name + ", MAC address: " + macAddress;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object o) {
            if (o == this) {
                return true;
            }
            if (!(o instanceof SimpleBluetoothDevice)) {
                return false;
            }
            SimpleBluetoothDevice otherDevice = (SimpleBluetoothDevice) o;
            if (name == null) {
                return macAddress.equalsIgnoreCase(otherDevice.macAddress);
            } else if (macAddress == null) {
                return name.equals(otherDevice.name);
            } else {
                return name.equals(otherDevice.name) || macAddress.equalsIgnoreCase(otherDevice.macAddress);
            }
        }

        /**
         * It is recommended to override {@link Object#hashCode()} in every class that overrides
         * {@link Object#equals(Object)}. <br><br> But two instances of this class will be equal, if
         * their MAC addresses (the
         * case of the characters is ignored) or names are equal. Collections, such as
         * {@link HashSet}, {@link HashMap}, cannot be used because the hash codes of logically
         * equal instances are not the same.
         * 
         */
        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            return 1;
        }
    }
}

I modified the code. So, two objects are considered equal if

  • their names are equal
  • their MAC addresses are equal ignoring case considerations
  • both conditions are met

Update #2.

Without equals

public class Main {

    private static final Set<SimpleBluetoothDevice> BLUETOOTH_DEVICES = new HashSet<SimpleBluetoothDevice>();

    static {
        BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice("G1", "38:ec:e4:d7:ad:a2"));
        BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice("Nokia N9", "40:98:4E:48:1D:B0"));
        BLUETOOTH_DEVICES.add(new SimpleBluetoothDevice("Galaxy S4", "08:FC:88:AD:4A:62"));
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SimpleBluetoothDevice myDevice = new SimpleBluetoothDevice(null, "38:ec:e4:d7:ad:a2");
        for (SimpleBluetoothDevice device : BLUETOOTH_DEVICES) {
            if (myDevice.macAddress == null || device.macAddress == null) {
                if (myDevice.name.equals(device.name)) {
                    System.out.println("Name");
                    break;
                }
            } else if (myDevice.name == null || device.name == null) {
                if (myDevice.macAddress.equalsIgnoreCase(device.macAddress)) {
                    System.out.println("MAC");
                    break;
                }
            } else {
                if (myDevice.macAddress.equalsIgnoreCase(device.macAddress) || myDevice.name.equals(device.name)) {
                    System.out.println("Either of them");
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * This class only contains two text fields: MAC address and name.
     * 
     * @author Maxim Dmitriev
     * 
     */
    private static final class SimpleBluetoothDevice {

        final String macAddress;
        final String name;

        /**
         * 
         * @param name
         * @param macAddress
         * 
         * Throws an {@link IllegalArgumentException} if both parameters are null
         */
        SimpleBluetoothDevice(String name, String macAddress) {
            if (name == null && macAddress == null) {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("Both a name and a MAC address cannot be null");
            }
            this.name = name;
            this.macAddress = macAddress;
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Currently you can't implement even equals in a way which obeys the contract of Object.equals which statesstates:

The equals method implements an equivalence relation on non-null object references:

...

  • It is transitive: for any non-null reference values x, y, and z, if x.equals(y) returns true and y.equals(z) returns true, then x.equals(z) should return true

Consider these three objects:

x: Name=foo MacAddress=m1
y: Name=bar MacAddress=m1
z: Name=bar MacAddress=m2

Now x.equals(y) will be true, and y.equals(z) will be true, which should mean that x.equals(z) is true... but it isn't.

Until you've worked out a form of equality which satisfies the transitivity contract, there's no point in worrying about hashCode. If nothing else, a hashCode implementation which always returns 0 is always "correct" (though clearly not useful in terms of performance). That won't help you much while your equality check is broken though.

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Yes, I need to rethink my equals –  Maksim Dmitriev Oct 28 '13 at 10:50
    
I modified the code, but the transitivity test failed. What do I need to do? I need equals only for contains, and those tests are passed. Please take a look at Update #1 –  Maksim Dmitriev Oct 29 '13 at 6:54
1  
@MaksimDmitriev: Fundamentally your equality relation isn't transitive. This isn't an implementation problem - it's a design problem. You need to design your equality relation to be transitive to start with - and while it's based on "this part is equal or that part is equal" it won't be transitive. –  Jon Skeet Oct 29 '13 at 7:00
    
"This part is equal or the other part is equal is a requirement. So, I shouldn't implement equals at all. And in order to determine, whether a list or a set contains an element, I can use a loop. The code is above. –  Maksim Dmitriev Oct 29 '13 at 8:37

The design of many collections requires that equals implement an equivalence relation that allows objects to be divided into equivalence sets (some of which may only contain one item) such that every object within a set will compare equal, and no object will compare equal to any object in another set. It is sometimes useful, however, to perform "fuzzy" comparisons which can find not only objects in the same set as a given object, but also ones that are in some sense "nearby". It is not possible for a single query to find an item which is only stored once, but it may be possible to achieve fuzzy matching if one redundantly stores items or uses multiple queries (not necessarily very many). In your case, for example, you might be able to define your equals operation so that both fields must match, but when adding to the table an item (X,Y) where neither value is null, add (X,null) and (null,Y) as well. Alternatively, you could might be able to have a table that maps MAC addresses to names and another which maps names to MAC addresses; if given one form of ID but not the other, use the appropriate table to get the other, and then look that up as a pair.

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