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I was finding out the algorithm for finding out the square root without using sqrt function and then tried to put into programming. I end up with this working code in C++

    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;

    double SqrtNumber(double num)
    {
             double lower_bound=0; 
             double upper_bound=num;
             double temp=0;                    /* ek edited this line */

             int nCount = 50;

        while(nCount != 0)
        {
               temp=(lower_bound+upper_bound)/2;
               if(temp*temp==num) 
               {
                       return temp;
               }
               else if(temp*temp > num)

               {
                       upper_bound = temp;
               }
               else
               {
                       lower_bound = temp;
               }
        nCount--;
     }
        return temp;
     }

     int main()
     {
     double num;
     cout<<"Enter the number\n";
     cin>>num;

     if(num < 0)
     {
     cout<<"Error: Negative number!";
     return 0;
     }

     cout<<"Square roots are: +"<<sqrtnum(num) and <<" and -"<<sqrtnum(num);
     return 0;
     } 

Now the problem is initializing the number of iterations nCount in the declaratione ( here it is 50). For example to find out square root of 36 it takes 22 iterations, so no problem whereas finding the square root of 15625 takes more than 50 iterations, So it would return the value of temp after 50 iterations. Please give a solution for this.

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4  
:) root = pow(x,0.5); –  jrok Oct 26 '13 at 19:57
2  
Usually you check the difference each iteration is making, and when it drops below a certain level, you treat the result as accurate enough. Also note that Newton's method is usually quite a bit faster than bisection like you're using. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 26 '13 at 19:57
1  
what about checking the difference between temp*temp and the number and stopping the loop if is close enough ? –  Martin Beckett Oct 26 '13 at 19:57
    
@jrok love it! On a serious note, this is the professional way: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_method –  Bathsheba Oct 26 '13 at 20:02
    
@MartinBeckett yeah it worked if(temp*temp-num > 0.001) {upper_bound = temp;}else { lower_bound = temp; } Is 0.001 good to check close enough? –  Arun Pandey Oct 26 '13 at 20:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your algorithm is pretty bad. There is better algorithm, which needs at most 6 iterations to converge to maximum precision for double numbers:

#include <math.h>

double sqrt(double x) {
    if (x <= 0)
        return 0;       // if negative number throw an exception?
    int exp = 0;
    x = frexp(x, &exp); // extract binary exponent from x
    if (exp & 1) {      // we want exponent to be even
        exp--;
        x *= 2;
    }
    double y = (1+x)/2; // first approximation
    double z = 0;
    while (y != z) {    // yes, we CAN compare doubles here!
        z = y;
        y = (y + x/y) / 2;
    }
    return ldexp(y, exp/2); // multiply answer by 2^(exp/2)
}

Algorithm starts with 1 as first approximation for square root value. Then, on each step, it improves next approximation by taking average between current value y and x/y. If y = sqrt(x), it will be the same. If y > sqrt(x), then x/y < sqrt(x) by about the same amount. In other words, it will converge very fast.

UPDATE: To speed up convergence on very large or very small numbers, changed sqrt() function to extract binary exponent and compute square root from number in [1, 4) range. It now needs frexp() from <math.h> to get binary exponent, but it is possible to get this exponent by extracting bits from IEEE-754 number format without using frexp().

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thanks :) that's what I wanted –  Arun Pandey Oct 26 '13 at 20:32
    
I guess the condition for the stopping rule should use less than (or equal): while (fabs(y-z) <= 0.00000000001 –  Emmad Kareem Oct 26 '13 at 20:35
    
@EmmadKareem: nope, rule is fine. I would change it to use relative precision though - it may have trouble for very large numbers. Another nice improvement is to limit number of rounds to say 20 –  mvp Oct 26 '13 at 20:37
    
@MVP, Yes, good point. Thanks. –  Emmad Kareem Oct 26 '13 at 20:40
    
I did some tests, and for numbers 1 to 4 it only takes 6 rounds to converge to maximum double precision. However, for large numbers like 1000000 it will take longer. Solution is to take exponent separately, and compute sqrt only from number that neither large nor small - somewhere around 1. This way number of rounds can be even fixed to be say 6. –  mvp Oct 26 '13 at 20:48

Remove your nCount altogether (as there are some roots that this algorithm will take many iterations for).

double SqrtNumber(double num)
{
    double lower_bound=0; 
    double upper_bound=num;
    double temp=0;

    while(fabs(num - (temp * temp)) > SOME_SMALL_VALUE)
    {
           temp = (lower_bound+upper_bound)/2;
           if (temp*temp >= num)
           {
                   upper_bound = temp;
           }
           else
           {
                   lower_bound = temp;
           }
    }
    return temp;
 }
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not working it just shows nearest values even for the perfect square –  Arun Pandey Oct 26 '13 at 20:18
    
okay it's abs which causing problem.. fabs solve it –  Arun Pandey Oct 26 '13 at 20:21
    
thanks for the solution :) –  Arun Pandey Oct 26 '13 at 20:33
    
Oops, yes, you are correct (sorry, typing too fast). As @mvp pointed out, this is a very slow algorithm for finding square root approximations. There are others that are much faster. –  Zac Howland Oct 26 '13 at 20:36

Here is a very awesome code to find sqrt and even faster than original sqrt function.

float InvSqrt (float x) 
{
    float xhalf = 0.5f*x;
    int i = *(int*)&x;
    i = 0x5f375a86 - (i>>1);
    x = *(float*)&i;
    x = x*(1.5f - xhalf*x*x);
    x = x*(1.5f - xhalf*x*x);
    x = x*(1.5f - xhalf*x*x);
    x=1/x;
    return x;
}
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if you need to find square root without using sqrt(),use root=pow(x,0.5).

Where x is value whose square root you need to find.

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