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I'm trying to write a shell script "echo.by" that echoes its arguments as many times as the user chooses. For example, if the user enters the command line

echo.by 5 Play it again, Sam. <return> 

The script should print

Play it again, Sam. 
Play it again, Sam. 
Play it again, Sam. 
Play it again, Sam. 
Play it again, Sam. 

However, I do not know how to print only Play it again, Sam and exclude the first argument. The $* command prints everything, so I end up with

5 Play it again, Sam. 
5 Play it again, Sam. 
5 Play it again, Sam. 
5 Play it again, Sam. 
5 Play it again, Sam. 

My script needs to be able to accommodate any script after the first number, so I can't just tell the shell to echo $2 $3 $4 $5.

Here is my script:

count = 0 
while test $count -lt $1 
do 
echo $* 
count = `expr $count + 1` 
done
share|improve this question
    
FYI -- count = 0 is running the program count with arguments = and 0. If you want to do an assignment, you need to leave out the space: count=0. Also, ((count++)) is much easier to write than count=$(( count + 1 )) (again, no spaces allowed around the =). –  Charles Duffy Oct 26 '13 at 20:44
    
...also -- quotes; use 'em. echo "$*", not echo $*. If someone passed a quoted '*' in your arguments, you wouldn't want it to be replaced with a list of files in the current directory, would you? Guess what happens if you don't quote your arguments... –  Charles Duffy Oct 26 '13 at 20:45

4 Answers 4

Just put $1 in a variable which you will reference later, and then add shift to the top of your script.

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1  
This is probably the best answer here in terms of correctness. Considered adding a code sample? –  Charles Duffy Oct 26 '13 at 21:10

Try doing this using a C style for loop and array slice :

#!/bin/bash

for ((i=0; i<$1; i++)); do
    echo "${@:2:${#@}}"
done
share|improve this answer
 #!/bin/bash
 times="$1"
 shift
 for f in $(seq "$times"); do
     echo "$@"
 done

EDIT: Changed $times to be lower-case as @Charles Duffy suggested. For greater compatibility with other POSIX(-like) systems you might want to change the loop to use the C-style for-syntax. The seq command is available in NetBSD, FreeBSD and GNU systems.

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2  
seq is not a POSIX-standard tool. Better to use a C-style for loop since you're already specifying bash rather than POSIX sh. for ((i=0; i<$1; i++)); do ... –  Charles Duffy Oct 26 '13 at 20:42
    
Yes, that is indeed a fair point. –  Johannes Weiß Oct 26 '13 at 20:48
    
Edited accordingly. (Also moved to a lower-case variable name -- by convention, all-caps should be reserved for environment variables and builtins to avoid namespace conflicts). –  Charles Duffy Oct 26 '13 at 21:36
    
As I said: I like your suggestion but did deliberately not change my answer. There is more than one way to achieve the same and I think your change changes are way to major for an "edit". I'd suggest to submit your own answer. I'll therefore roll back. –  Johannes Weiß Oct 26 '13 at 23:57
    
...by the way, you're missing an in; it should be for f in .... –  Charles Duffy Oct 27 '13 at 0:54
#!/bin/bash
times="$1"
shift
for ((f=0; f<times; i++)); do
    printf '%s\n' "$*"
done
share|improve this answer
    
Why the overhead of using printf and a formatted string, rather than simply echoing the input? –  Adam Liss Oct 27 '13 at 2:14
    
@AdamLiss printf is not overhead -- it's a shell builtin, the same as echo is; its advantage over echo (besides the flexibility offered by format strings) is more consistent behavior across platforms -- POSIX is ambiguous over whether echo takes options, whereas printf behaves the same way across all platforms. –  Charles Duffy Oct 27 '13 at 4:22
1  
@AdamLiss ...for a concrete example of a case where echo will do the wrong thing, consider echo.by 5 -n; the printf version will correctly print -n five times; the echo version will print nothing on a system which chooses to implement echo -n. –  Charles Duffy Oct 27 '13 at 4:28

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