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Please look at the picture below. When we create an object in java with new keyword, we are getting a memory address from the OS.

When we write out.println(objName) we can see a "special" string as output. My questions are:

  1. What is this output?
  2. If it is memory address which given by OS to us: a) How can I convert this string to binary? b) How can I get one integer variables address?

alt text

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well I'm not voting down because the question is clear enough, just a suggestion that you should have made it in text so people can search for it –  phunehehe Dec 25 '09 at 13:16
    
I edited the question. –  uzay95 Dec 25 '09 at 13:21
    
Looks good now it's edited –  Brian Agnew Dec 25 '09 at 13:35
2  
Using the sun.misc.Unsafe it is possible to get the address of a java object. For program listing refer: javapapers.com/core-java/address-of-a-java-object –  Joseph Kulandai Jul 16 '10 at 10:30
    
most people are downvoting because they cannot answer the question. –  kiltek Jun 22 '13 at 14:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 40 down vote accepted

That is the object name and System.identityHashCode() separated by the '@' character. What the identity hash code represents is implementation-specific. It often is the initial memory address of the object, but the object can be moved in memory by the VM over time. So (briefly) you can't rely on it being anything.

Getting the memory addresses of variables is meaningless within Java, since the JVM is at liberty to implement objects and move them as it seems fit (your objects may/will move around during garbage collection etc.)

Integer.toBinaryString() will give you an integer in binary form.

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A@....... What do A and @ show? –  uzay95 Dec 25 '09 at 13:46
    
See above (edited answer) –  Brian Agnew Dec 25 '09 at 13:49
12  
Another interesting point is that identity hash codes are not guaranteed to be unique. For instance on 64-bit JVM there are 2^32 identity hash codes but 2^64 memory addresses. –  Alexandre Jasmin Dec 25 '09 at 14:42
    
Nice bit of trivia there Alexandre. –  James Poulson Dec 25 '09 at 23:43
1  
Actually, the identity hash code cannot change, otherwise the contract of hashCode() would be violated. –  Matt McHenry Jun 28 '13 at 18:36

That is the output of Object's "toString()" implementation. If your class overrides toString(), it will print something entirely different.

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This is not memory address This is classname@hashcode

where

classname = full qualified name or absolute name (ie package name followed by class name)

hashcode = hexadecimal format (System.identityHashCode(obj) or obj.hashCode() will give you hashcode in decimal format)

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It is possible using sun.misc.Unsafe : see this great answer from @Peter Lawrey -> Is there a way to get a reference address?

Using its code for printAddresses() :

    public static void printAddresses(String label, Object... objects) {
    System.out.print(label + ": 0x");
    long last = 0;
    int offset = unsafe.arrayBaseOffset(objects.getClass());
    int scale = unsafe.arrayIndexScale(objects.getClass());
    switch (scale) {
    case 4:
        long factor = is64bit ? 8 : 1;
        final long i1 = (unsafe.getInt(objects, offset) & 0xFFFFFFFFL) * factor;
        System.out.print(Long.toHexString(i1));
        last = i1;
        for (int i = 1; i < objects.length; i++) {
            final long i2 = (unsafe.getInt(objects, offset + i * 4) & 0xFFFFFFFFL) * factor;
            if (i2 > last)
                System.out.print(", +" + Long.toHexString(i2 - last));
            else
                System.out.print(", -" + Long.toHexString( last - i2));
            last = i2;
        }
        break;
    case 8:
        throw new AssertionError("Not supported");
    }
    System.out.println();
}

I set up this test :

    //hashcode
    System.out.println("Hashcode :       "+myObject.hashCode());
    System.out.println("Hashcode :       "+System.identityHashCode(myObject));
    System.out.println("Hashcode (HEX) : "+Integer.toHexString(myObject.hashCode()));

    //toString
    System.out.println("toString :       "+String.valueOf(myObject));

    printAddresses("Address", myObject);

Here is the output :

Hashcode :       125665513
Hashcode :       125665513
Hashcode (HEX) : 77d80e9
toString :       java.lang.Object@77d80e9
Address: 0x7aae62270

Conclusion :

  • hashcode != address
  • toString = class@HEX(hashcode)
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What you are getting is the result of the toString() method of the Object class or, more precisely, the identityHashCode() as uzay95 has pointed out.

"When we create an object in java with new keyword, we are getting a memory address from the OS."

It is important to realize that everything you do in Java is handled by the Java Virtual Machine. It is the JVM that is giving this information. What actually happens in the RAM of the host operating system depends entirely on the implementation of the JRE.

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