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Lets say I have two lists, ((1 2 3)) and (((1 2 3)) ((4 5))). I want to be able to tell if the first list is a member of the second list. I have tried to use subsetp, but it does not return true for this query. How can I accomplish this?

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How would the first list be a subset of the second list??? –  Rainer Joswig Oct 26 '13 at 22:01
    
Because the first element of the second list is equal to the first list. –  Suraj Kulkarni Oct 26 '13 at 22:19
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That's not what a subset is. That's membership. The first list is a member of the second list, but not a subset. –  Rainer Joswig Oct 26 '13 at 23:12
    
I apologize for the incorrect wording. How would I solve the membership problem then? –  Suraj Kulkarni Oct 26 '13 at 23:47
2  
member checks if an given element is a top-level element of a list. subsetp checks if every element of list-1 is a top-level element of list-2. If you want to check membership, maybe that's want you want: (member '((1 2 3)) '(((1 2 3)) ((4 5))) :test #'tree-equal) –  Frank Zalkow Oct 27 '13 at 7:46

2 Answers 2

As Rainer Joswig mentioned in the comments, you're not checking for subsets, but for members, which you can do using the aptly named member function. Member returns a generalized boolean, i.e., nil for false, and something, not necessarily t, non-nil for true. Specifically, if an element is a member of the list, member returns the tail of the list whose first element is the element.

CL-USER> (member 3 '(1 2 3 4 5))
(3 4 5)
CL-USER> (member 7 '(1 2 3 4 5))
NIL

Of course, when checking membership in a list, there's a question of how to compare the given item with the elements of the list. Member's default comparison is eql, which works on things like numbers, as shown in the example above. For your case, however, you probably want to test with equal, since ((1 2 3)) might not be the same object as the first element of (((1 2 3)) ((4 5))):

CL-USER> (member '((1 2 3)) '(((1 2 3)) ((4 5))))
NIL
CL-USER> (member '((1 2 3)) '(((1 2 3)) ((4 5))) :test 'equal)
(((1 2 3)) ((4 5)))
CL-USER> (member '((4 5)) '(((1 2 3)) ((4 5))) :test 'equal)
(((4 5)))
CL-USER> (member '((1 2 4)) '(((1 2 3)) ((4 5))) :test 'equal)
NIL
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If you want to have lists as elements of your sets for subsetp, you have to change the value of the :test keyword.

CL-USER 1 > (subsetp '(1 2 3) '(1 2 3 4 5))
T
CL-USER 2 > (subsetp '((1) (2) (3)) '((1) (2) (3) (4) (5)))
NIL

The first one gives T, the second one gives NIL. Why? Because equality is checked with #'eql which works for identical objects or numbers of the same value and of same type. Since two lists must not be identical objects, (eql '(1) '(1)) gives NIL. (That may depend on your CL implementation.) If you want to compare a tree of conses, tree-equal can help you.

CL-USER 3 > (subsetp '((1) (2) (3)) '((1) (2) (3) (4) (5)) :test #'tree-equal)
T

I don't understand the structure of the sets you gave as example completely, but I hope this helps.

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Unfortunately it doesn't work on my list structure –  Suraj Kulkarni Oct 26 '13 at 23:47

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