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So i have these lines of code that generate a random number actualy a unique random number but this code isn't very good when you have to generate 160 numbers. Every generated number is added to an array and every time a new number it's generated the array is checked and if the number is on the array another number is generated if the number isn't in the array it is displayed. Please help me simplify this code so it doesn't need that much memory and also: Everything works well until the random generator reches 157 then it cracks... and i can't seem to know why... Please help me make it better!!! THX

var randomNum:int = 0;
var randomGen:int = 0;
var myArray:Array = [];

function setup()
{
displayRandomNumber();

var_corect.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, randomNumberEvent);
}
setup();

function randomNumberEvent(e:MouseEvent)
{
displayRandomNumber();
}
function displayRandomNumber()
{
randomGen = randBetween(1, 160);
randomNumberText.text = randomGen.toString();
trace ('Number is:'+ randomNumberText.text);
if(myArray.indexOf(randomGen) == -1){
myArray.push(randomGen);

}else{
displayRandomNumber()
    }
trace("my array" + myArray);

}

function randBetween(min:int, max:int):int 
{
return Math.round(Math.random() * (max - min) + min);
}
share|improve this question
    
It becomes inefficient near the end due to your algorithm design. Consider: at the end, the odds of randomly choosing the last number not present are only 1/168 -- all other values must loop and re-choose. Also, the cost of scanning the array is 168x that of scanning just one element. In conclusion, your last iteration will be about 28,224 times slower than the first. Second-to-last will be 14,028 times slower. Third-to-last will be 9296 times slower. Iteration cost is proportional to (168 / (168-N)) * N. –  Thomas W Oct 26 '13 at 22:55

4 Answers 4

Here's a very quick way since you don't have to check if it's been chosen before :

--Create an array of 168 numbers - or how ever many numbers you want and whatever range.

--Create a loop for how many you want select.

--Each iteration choose one randomly and splice it from the array - for example :

var randomIndex:int = Math.random() * pool.length;

var choice:int = pool.splice(randomIndex,1).pop();

--If the array is empty create a new one and repeat the same process, if that is what you want to do.

Using this process, you will never have to check to see if the number is unique. You just have to check if the array is empty, meaning you have selected each number once.

Much quicker because you never have to generate a random number a 2nd, 3rd, or 4th etc time.

share|improve this answer
    
Made a modification, forgot to do the splice for the choice. You have to do the pop() because splice returns an Array of the the spliced value(s). –  prototypical Oct 26 '13 at 22:30
    
i need a unique number to be generated until all numbers from 1 to 160 are generated –  Alexandru Balea Oct 28 '13 at 22:47
    
That's what this does. Whatever numbers are in that array, are what will be randomly chosen until there are none remaining. There will be no duplicates. –  prototypical Oct 28 '13 at 23:09
    
i've managed to make it work thx a lot for the help –  Alexandru Balea Oct 29 '13 at 4:22

It becomes inefficient near the end due to your algorithm design. 'Loop and re-choose' is a fairly well-known anti-pattern when dealing with random numbers.

Consider: at the end, the odds of randomly choosing the last number not present are only 1/168 -- all other values must loop and re-choose.

Also, the cost of scanning the array is 168x that of scanning just one element.

In conclusion, your last iteration will be about 28,224 times slower than the first. Second-to-last will be 14,028 times slower. Third-to-last will be 9296 times slower. Iteration cost is proportional to (168 / (168-N)) * N.

As the other answer said, instead of choosing numbers & having to loop -- generate the numbers, then choose indices within that list to "shuffle them". That's how they do it with cards...

share|improve this answer
    
nice new info for me thx –  Alexandru Balea Oct 26 '13 at 23:56

you can check this algorithm(Fisher-Yates shuffle) it looks very useful.

  • its choosing pivot with starting last element of your array(its up to you you can start with first element just modify the while loop)

  • picking random element with using pivot's index from your array

  • and it relocates these two elements from array

btw it could pick same element randomly but its not an issue you are shuffling if you want to get better result just call function multiple times ....

i took the code from here

function shuffle(array) {
  var m = array.length, t, i;

  // While there remain elements to shuffle…
  while (m) {

    // Pick a remaining element…
    i = Math.floor(Math.random() * m--);

    // And swap it with the current element.
    t = array[m];
    array[m] = array[i];
    array[i] = t;
  }

  return array;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is truly optimized more, but unless you have a massive amount of elements to shuffle, I'd opt for the second option on that page (which is basically my answer) as it's cleaner. The original code would have a significant slowdown, even with a relatively small Array. For something small like a deck of cards or these 168 numbers, it's not even going to be a perceptible difference to go the 3rd route. –  prototypical Oct 26 '13 at 23:21
    
yea but i think this one is more clear to understand. anyway all of are iteration of eac other. –  Bolzano Oct 26 '13 at 23:46
    
well i will need to use a lot of elements in the future i will have at least 300 elements so what can i do so it doesn't need to much resorces also...??? –  Alexandru Balea Oct 26 '13 at 23:58
1  
I think even 300 is minimal. Especially if you are doing this once as a part of a setup process. But if this was something you were doing far more often and with far more elements, it'd be a great candidate for optimization. –  prototypical Oct 27 '13 at 0:02
1  
With 10k elements, that's in a range where I think the 3rd implementation could yield significant optimization if the shuffle is happening each frame or something. However, can't think of a situation where I was ever shuffling an array of that size every frame. So benchmarks don't mean much unless you have need for such an optimization. Code clarity vs optimization. I tend to prioritize clarity over optimization, unless optimization is needed. But yeah, not a big deal at all. –  prototypical Oct 28 '13 at 5:28

Make a array with number from 1 to 160. Random between 0 and 159. Take the randomed index and put last. Next time random between 0 to 158, and put that index last. Random 0 to 157 and so on ...

function shuffle(theArray:Array) {
var m=theArray.length; var num:Int; var i:int;
while (m) {

i = Math.floor(Math.random() * m--);
num=index[i];
theArray.splice(i,1);
theArray.push(num);}

return theArray;}
share|improve this answer
    
thx but i need a really optimized function these will only add a lot of functions that would not help me to much thx –  Alexandru Balea Oct 27 '13 at 0:00
    
Added code to show how, much similar to the answer before. Think there will be a array method there you pic on and put it last, but didnt found. If there are, you can make the code much less in the while loop. theArray.theMethodIdontfind(Math.floor(Math.random()*m--)); –  user1894606 Oct 28 '13 at 9:25

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