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I am using MongoDB as a queue and PHP-Queue as a way to get the data. This is a POC and I am running on an OSX machine. I am seeing very slow performance from Mongo, namely the findmodify function. I did a bunch of testing on the PHP end and PHP processing only accounts for about 5% of the time. When I fill the Mongo collection, with say, 10,000 messages, it fills very quickly, on the order of 3-5 seconds. But when I empty it, it takes about 250 seconds. Only about 10 seconds of this time is on the php side. Checking the mongod process, it never goes over about 60MB but the CPU spikes for over 90% the entire time. I have indexed the collection, and below is a sample of the message data as well as the index.

Example message(this is one of 10,000 similar messages in the queue):

{
  "_id": ObjectId("526c47d5c5008c1d5cd63ef8"),
  "payload": {
    "0": {
      "EVENT_HEADER_KEY": NumberInt(9094775),
      "event_name": "Account Change",
      "source_name": "Work",
      "event_category_name": "Complex Events",
      "EVENT_TIMESTAMP": "Aug 17 2013 12:00:00:000AM",
      "PARENT_HEADER_KEY": null,
      "year": NumberInt(2013),
      "month": NumberInt(10),
      "Company_Name": "ACME PRODUCTS, INC.",
      "Company_Email": "blabla",
      "Company_Phone": "555-555-5555",
      "First_Name": "Jon",
      "Last_Name": "Doe",
      "ID_NUMBER": "111111111",
      "created_by": "Load Job Name",
      "created_at": "Oct 18 2013 04:07:31:140PM",
      "product_analytical_category": "blabla",
      "_Event_Type": "blabla",
      "CUSTOMER_ID": "111111111"
   }
 },
  "running": false,
  "resetTimestamp": ISODate("2038-01-19T03:14:07.0Z"),
  "earliestGet": ISODate("1970-01-01T00:00:00.0Z"),
  "priority": 0,
  "created": ISODate("2013-10-26T22:53:09.440Z")
}   

Index of this collection, which seems to have been created automatically:

{
   "_id": NumberInt(1)
}

Checking the mongo.log, I can see that as I empty the queue, it only takes about 1 millisecond per message for about 70 messages, then the opid will change, and then there will be a 300-900 ms delay then it continues with the new opid at the same pace of about 1 millisecond per message. These opid changes account for about 50-100 seconds of the 250 seconds processing time, so there is still more going on.

Excerpt from the mongo.log:

**Sat Oct 26 15:15:25.189** [conn4] warning: ClientCursor::yield can't unlock b/c of recursive lock ns: test.abe top: { **opid: 20064**, active: true, secs_running: 0, op: "query", ns: "test", query: { findandmodify: "abe", query: { running: false, earliestGet: { $lte: new Date(1382825725143) } }, update: { $set: { resetTimestamp: new Date(1382825785000), running: true } }, fields: { payload: 1 }, sort: { priority: 1, created: 1 } }, client: "127.0.0.1:53045", desc: "conn4", threadId: "0x119024000", connectionId: 4, locks: { ^: "w", ^test: "W" }, waitingForLock: false, numYields: 0, lockStats: { timeLockedMicros: {}, timeAcquiringMicros: { r: 0, w: 3 } } }

**Sat Oct 26 15:15:25.190** [conn4] warning: ClientCursor::yield can't unlock b/c of recursive lock ns: test.abe top: { **opid: 20064**, active: true, secs_running: 0, op: "query", ns: "test", query: { findandmodify: "abe", query: { running: false, earliestGet: { $lte: new Date(1382825725143) } }, update: { $set: { resetTimestamp: new Date(1382825785000), running: true } }, fields: { payload: 1 }, sort: { priority: 1, created: 1 } }, client: "127.0.0.1:53045", desc: "conn4", threadId: "0x119024000", connectionId: 4, locks: { ^: "w", ^test: "W" }, waitingForLock: false, numYields: 0, lockStats: { timeLockedMicros: {}, timeAcquiringMicros: { r: 0, w: 3 } } }

**Sat Oct 26 15:15:25.507** [conn4] warning: ClientCursor::yield can't unlock b/c of recursive lock ns: test.abe top: { **opid: 20141**, active: true, secs_running: 0, op: "query", ns: "test", query: { findandmodify: "abe", query: { running: false, earliestGet: { $lte: new Date(1382825725501) } }, update: { $set: { resetTimestamp: new Date(1382825785000), running: true } }, fields: { payload: 1 }, sort: { priority: 1, created: 1 } }, client: "127.0.0.1:53045", desc: "conn4", threadId: "0x119024000", connectionId: 4, locks: { ^: "w", ^test: "W" }, waitingForLock: false, numYields: 0, lockStats: { timeLockedMicros: {}, timeAcquiringMicros: { r: 0, w: 3 } } }

This is basically the same throughout the entire log of these 10,000 messages. There will be a long sequence of findandmodify() which only take 1 ms per message, then the opid changes and there is a delay which can take almost a second. I have no idea if this indicates anything important, but I am new to Mongo and I am trying to find any patterns that look promising.

UPDATE:

The query checks that the field 'running' is false and it also checks that the earliestGet field is more recent than the epoch (ie 1-1-1970). I added indexes to these fields to no avail. Since these fields are the same for all messages (which are 'false' and Jan 1, 1970) in the collection, maybe that is why my indexing of them only increases the query time. I have no idea what I should do to get this to work properly. It seems that it should grab the first record it finds that is newer than Jan 1, 1970 but apparently Mongo still goes through the whole collection, which makes the query too slow to be practical. Furthermore, even when I have NO selection criteria I still get response time of 202 seconds - faster, but still unacceptable. I also still see those "yield can't unlock b/c of recursive lock ns:" messages which I thought would only show up when querying un-indexed fields.

share|improve this question
    
btw, the yield can't unlock messages are spurious logging directly related to the fact that this query is inefficient (i.e. doesn't use an index) – Asya Kamsky Oct 26 '13 at 23:55
    
those messages show up on slow queries - usually that means unindexed. What about adding an index on {priority:1,created:1} - since your query isn't selective, you want to optimize the sort time - that should help. In general though it seems the real problem is the identical values for earliestGet - what is the point of that field? – Asya Kamsky Oct 27 '13 at 15:55
    
I think the coders wanted a selection criterion that would get anything later than the year 1970. I actually removed all query criteria, and it did improve the time it takes the clear the queue - BUT it is still amazingly slow and I still see those unlock notices in the mongo.log file. I will try out your advice but it seems that since I currently have no query criteria it should be fast regardless of indexing but it is not. – Joel Joel Binks Oct 27 '13 at 19:51
    
Sorting using an index is critical to good performance. If you remove the sort, it'll be very fast, or if you add an index for sort. – Asya Kamsky Oct 28 '13 at 1:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are missing a very critical index which would be used for the query and sort portion of the findAndModify command. Without that index, you are forcing each command to scan the entire collection and then sort the full result set which is inefficient. Now you said "I have indexed the collection" but you only mentioned '_id' index which is always present and cannot help you.

Recommendation: add a compound index on fields running and earliestGet at a minimum. It's possible that having an index include the sort fields may help, but since I would expect the number of matching documents for each query would be relatively small, the in memory sort may be less of a factor.

Command:

db.abe.ensureIndex({running:1, earliestGet:1})

It turned out in the comments discussion that the running, earliestGet index was not at all selective - but since you are sorting to only fetch the first matching document, the alternative is to add an index on the sort columns:

Command:

db.abe.ensureIndex({ priority: 1, created: 1 })
share|improve this answer
    
I think you are on the right track, but I ran the command you suggested and it actually slowed the response time down by another 50-60 seconds. I am going to check my data and be sure that the ensureIndex fields are put in correctly. – Joel Joel Binks Oct 27 '13 at 0:11
    
it's possible that you'll need to extend the index to include the fields being sorted by (since I don't know how many documents would satisfy the query, I can't guess) but secondly, your findAndModify also updates the indexed field, so it's not completely free. Lastly, if you don't have enough RAM, then index won't help much if it just causes more swapping - seeing what the system looks like under load can show where the likely bottlenecks are. – Asya Kamsky Oct 27 '13 at 0:18
    
I read that Mongo allocates as much RAM as it needs? Maybe that's wrong. But I have 16GB on this machine and the mongod process has never gone over 100MB memory. It seems to be CPU usage and I think your suggestion about indexing fields is correct but the implementation may be wrong. Do I need to wait a long time to index 10,000 rows of this data? According to the mongo CLI this collection only takes up 9MB of space when it has 10,000 rows. – Joel Joel Binks Oct 27 '13 at 0:22
    
when you run ensureIndex from mongo shell, when you get back the prompt it means the index is completely built. – Asya Kamsky Oct 27 '13 at 0:23
1  
another way to see if the index exists is to run db.collectionName.getIndexes() – Asya Kamsky Oct 27 '13 at 0:24

Without more detailed description what exactly are you doing during modify phase it is hard to give definitive answer. Judging from the log it seems you perform updates like this:

db.abc.findAndModify(
    query: { running: false, earliestGet: { $lte: new Date(1382825725143) } },
    update: { $set: { resetTimestamp: new Date(1382825785000), running: true } }
)

and there is no index on earliestGet field and running field. Because of low cardinality adding index on running shouldn't make a real difference, but lack of index on the earliestGet could be a real problem.

About warning: ClientCursor::yield can't unlock b/c of recursive lock ns: message you can see this question: MongoDB: Geting "Client Cursor::yield can't unlock b/c of recursive lock" warning when use findAndModify in two process instances

share|improve this answer
    
as part of a compound index, "running" field will make a great difference, as long as it's first field in the index. – Asya Kamsky Oct 27 '13 at 0:02
    
@AsyaKamsky Could you elaborate a little? I understand it can make difference if distribution of running is highly skewed and were interested in the rarest group but I think that otherwise search through {earliestGet: 1} only index can be at least as fast as using {running:1, earliestGet:1}. I've tested this hypothesis with simple random generated dataset and it seems that's exactly what is going on but it is early in the morning, I haven't slept much and still waiting for the coffee so it is highly probable that I messed something up. – zero323 Oct 27 '13 at 5:48
    
earliestGet alone will only be as fast as running,earliestGet if running has exactly one value. – Asya Kamsky Oct 27 '13 at 15:53
    
I ran an explain() of an empty query, and I still see it scans all 1000 messages I had at that time: db.abe.find().explain() { "cursor" : "BasicCursor", "isMultiKey" : false, "n" : 1000, "nscannedObjects" : 1000, "nscanned" : 1000, "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 1000, "nscannedAllPlans" : 1000, "scanAndOrder" : false, "indexOnly" : false, "nYields" : 0, "nChunkSkips" : 0, "millis" : 1, "indexBounds" : { }, "server" : "mycomputer.local:27017" } I guess this is normal behavior? Or is something awry.. The search continues. – Joel Joel Binks Oct 28 '13 at 18:04

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