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I'm trying to compile this program for monte carlo importance sampling, but i'm running into a couple issues:

1 - Error: Syntax error in data declaration at (1), referring to the following line, where the (1) is placed right after and beneath the word "function".

real function f(x)

2 - Error: Two main PROGRAMS at (1) and (2), referring to these two lines

program importance1

and

t=0.0

.

The sample code follows. There are more lines of code in the program, but I don't think there are any problems so I've just posted this first segment.

program importance1
implicit none
real mean_value,t,ta,rr
real x,xtrials,s_square_old,s_square_new,std_dev,std_error,frac_stand_dev
integer k
real :: alpha=0.90
integer :: trials=50
xtrials=trials

real function f(x)
f=exp(x)
return
end

real function g(x)
g=(alpha/(exp(alpha)-1.))*exp(alpha*x)
return
end

t=0.0
s_square_old=0.0
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure where you got the idea to do that, but it looks like you are defining functions in the middle of your code, which is the wrong place. In Fortran, the functions go in a separate MODULE or at the end of the program under a CONTAINS block:

program importance1
  implicit none
  real :: mean_value,t,ta,rr
  real :: x,xtrials,s_square_old,s_square_new,std_dev,std_error,frac_stand_dev
  integer :: k
  real :: alpha=0.90
  integer :: trials=50
  xtrials=trials

  t=0.0
  s_square_old=0.0

contains

  real function f(x)
    real :: x
    f=exp(x)
  end function

  real function g(x)
    real :: x
    g=(alpha/(exp(alpha)-1.))*exp(alpha*x)
  end function

end program
share|improve this answer
    
Functions and subroutines can also be placed above the program statement without contains. – milancurcic Oct 27 '13 at 2:26
    
True, nor is a module truly necessary. But using the module & contains will help the compiler catch errors in linking. – Kyle Kanos Oct 27 '13 at 2:34
2  
Yeah, definitely no excuse to not use modules nowadays. – milancurcic Oct 27 '13 at 2:37
    
That works, thank you very much. My professor gave some sample code but it didn't work as expected so I've just been messing around with it. – Alcaeos Oct 27 '13 at 3:56

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