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I will read in two set of char* (or strings) using strtok, and since those two set of chars are related, (address : command\n) I decided to use a structure.

struct line* array = (struct line*)malloc(sizeof(file) * sizeof(struct line*));

This line mallocing space for the function gives me a segmentation fault and was wondering if you can tell me a proper way to malloc space for it. For context, here is the rest of my code:

struct line
{
    char* addr;
    char* inst;
};
while loop{
    x = strtok(line,": ");
    y = strtok(NULL,"\n");
    strcpy(array[i].addr,x); //assume that x and y are always 3characters
    strcpy(array[i].inst,++y);
    i++;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Keep in mind that allocating memory for an array of struct line doesn't allocate memory for the addr and inst strings. Depending how those pointers inside the struct line are used you may need to also allocate the memory for the string data. – Michael Burr Oct 27 '13 at 1:52

Allocating works the same for all types. If you need to allocate an array of line structs, you do that with:

struct line* array = malloc(number_of_elements * sizeof(struct line));

In your code, you were allocating an array that had the appropriate size for line pointers, not for line structs. Also note that there is no reason to cast the return value of malloc().

Note that's it's better style to use:

sizeof(*array)

instead of:

sizeof(struct line)

The reason for this is that the allocation will still work as intended in case you change the type of array. In this case this is unlikely, but it's just a general thing worth getting used to.

Also note that it's possible to avoid having to repeat the word struct over and over again, by typedefing the struct:

typedef struct line
{
    char* addr;
    char* inst;
} line;

You can then just do:

line* array = malloc(number_of_elements * sizeof(*array));

Of course don't forget to also allocate memory for array.addr and array.inst.

share|improve this answer

For what you have described, You do not need to allocate memory for your struct, rather, you need to allocate memory for the members char *addr;, and char *inst;. If you want to have a single copy of that structure, the first section of code illustrates how to initialize, and assign values. If you want an array, the second code example illustrates the differences.

This illustrates how to allocate memory for the members of a single struct line:

typedef struct
{
    char* addr;
    char* inst;
}LINE;

LINE line;  

int main(void)
{   

    strcpy(line.addr, "anystring"); //will fail
    line.addr = malloc(80);
    line.inst = malloc(80);
    strcpy(line.addr, "someString");//success;
    strcpy(line.inst, "someOtherString");//success;

}

For array of struct line...

typedef struct
{
    char* addr;
    char* inst;
}LINE;  //same struct definition

LINE line[10]; //but create an array of line here.

int main(void)
{   
    int i;

    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
      line[i].addr = malloc(80);
      line[i].inst = malloc(80);
    }

    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        strcpy(line[i].addr, "someString");
        strcpy(line[i].inst, "someOtherString");
    }
    //when done, free memory
    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        free(line[i].addr);
        free(line[i].inst);
    }      


}
share|improve this answer
    
Or use strdup() and use the remainder of the 80 characters for something more useful. :-) – Adam Liss Oct 27 '13 at 2:23
    
@AdamLiss - Can't argue with more useful. – ryyker Oct 27 '13 at 4:50

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