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i have a singleton class. I am creating an object of it. Using it. Once it will go out of scope destructor will be called.

Again creating anew object, since instanceFlag is false, it will again allocate new memory.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Singleton
{
private:
    static bool instanceFlag;
    static Singleton *single;
    Singleton()
    {
        //private constructor
    }
public:
    static Singleton* getInstance()
    {
        if(! instanceFlag)
        {
            single = new Singleton();
            instanceFlag = true;
            return single;
        }
        else
        {
            return single;
        }
    }
    void method()
    {
        cout << "Method of the singleton class" << endl;
    }
    ~Singleton()
    {
        instanceFlag = false;
    }
};

bool Singleton::instanceFlag = false;
Singleton* Singleton::single = NULL;



int main()
{
    Singleton *sc1,*sc2;
    {
        sc1 = Singleton::getInstance();
        sc1->method();
        delete sc1;
    }
    sc2 = Singleton::getInstance();
    sc2->method();

    return 0;
}

My doubt is what will happen to old memory? I think its a memory leak. If yes how to fix this issue in the given code?

Any comments will be helpful to understand the internals.

share|improve this question
    
Question: You are taking a pointer to it, so how does it go out of scope? The pointer can go out of scope, but the object pointed to cannot. – kfsone Oct 27 '13 at 5:40
    
possible duplicate of C++ Singleton design pattern – Basilevs Oct 27 '13 at 5:41
    
when we allocate memory dynamically, but some how lose the way to reach that memory, then it is called memory leak. And this is happening in the above case. – Devesh Agrawal Oct 27 '13 at 5:44
    
if we have delete then how this code will react? int main() { Singleton *sc1,*sc2; sc2 = Singleton::getInstance(); { sc1 = Singleton::getInstance(); sc1->method(); delete sc1; } sc2->method(); return 0; } – Devesh Agrawal Oct 27 '13 at 5:52
    
^ I think there should be delete in the destructor insteade of in main – Sam Oct 27 '13 at 5:55

Pointers are variables that contain an address of something in memory. Like any other variable, a pointer can go out of scope, but that has no bearing on the information it is pointing to. This is how leaks happen.

{
    char* p = new char[128];
}

When p goes out of scope, the address of the allocation goes away, but the allocation is untouched; it is still allocated and its contents unaffected any more than throwing away an envelope affects the house it was addressed to.

To solve that you would need something with ref counts, like std::shared_ptr/std::weak_ptr or a RAII container like std::unique_ptr, etc. Something that has a destructor to go out of scope with.

It's better to implement the Singleton pattern with references.

class Singleton {
    Singleton() {
        // constructor code...
    }
    static Singleton s_singleton;
public:
    static Singleton& GetSingleton() {
        return s_singleton;
    }
};

or

class Singleton {
    Singleton() = delete; // if you don't have a ctor, lets not have one at all.
public:
    static Singleton& GetSingleton() {
        static singleton;
        return singleton;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I like this answer. I must say though, I prefer using = delete; instead of private constructor. – Brandon Oct 27 '13 at 5:55
1  
Oh - it's actually implemented, not deleted - just an empty body because I didn't have anything to put in it. – kfsone Oct 27 '13 at 5:59
    
There - I did one variant in each example :) – kfsone Oct 27 '13 at 6:00
    
unique_ptr is not ref counted. You're thinking of shared_ptr/weak_ptr. – SoapBox Oct 27 '13 at 6:03
    
@SoapBox good point, fixed – kfsone Oct 27 '13 at 6:32

I use valgrind which is easy to use, it is used to detect memory leak. http://valgrind.org/docs/manual/quick-start.html

See headfirst c tutorial to detect memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 using valgrind on design stage smells. – Basilevs Oct 27 '13 at 5:42

sc1 and sc2 are pointers, they are not Singleton objects. There is no call to Singleton::~Singleton() when they go out of scope.

Your problem lies elsewhere. When you delete sc1, you're not setting Singleton::instanceFlag to false. That means that sc2->method() dereferences a pointer to a deleted object.

You should make the destructor private instead and introduce a new member function for deleting the object. Also, you don't really need Singleton::instanceFlag. Simply check for Singleton::single == NULL. When deleting it, set it to NULL again.

share|improve this answer

Singletons are not supposed to be deleted.

Your question is already answered.

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