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What I mean by type is something that would allow me to do the following.

public class AnyObject{

    List<this.type> list;   

}

I know the following dosen't work.

public class AnyObject{

    List<this.getClass()> list;   

}

So how would I create a lets say a list, for example sake, of type of whatever this is?

--------------- UPDATE ---------------

I apologize I don't think I was clear. I seem to be getting that there is no way to escape type erasure, but if there is still away to solve my problem I will explain it better. Disclosure, this is more of an Objectify question. Sorry I have come to see that now.

Here we go, clear as I can ...

For every entity I plan to persist, in GAE datastore using Objectiy, I would like to have a method to generate an Objectify Key<?> using the id and parent field. Lets call this method generateKey(). here is how it looks.

public Key<MyEntity> generateKey() {      
    Key<MyEntity> key = Key.create(this.parent, MyEntity.class, this.id);
    return key;
}

The problem is I have to write this exact code, more or less, for every entity I create. Actually, there is other repeated code, but my point can be made with this piece of repeated code alone.

So I tried this. I created a class called MyProjectEntity and have all my entitys extend it. Then implemented a generateKey() method using generics.

public abstract class MyProjectEntity<T, Y> {

    @Id     Long id;
    @Parent Key<T> parentKey;

    public Key<Y> generateKey() {
        Key<Y> key = Key.create(this.parentKey, this.getClass(), this.id);
        return key;
    }          

}

Then I extended all my entity classes with this new class I created called MyProjectEntity. Like such ...

@Entity
public class MyEntity extends MyProjectEntity<MyEntityParent> {...}

Sounds good, now all my entity will have a generateKey() method, well this didn't quite work. Objectify yelled at me and said IllegalArgumentException, can not declare Key of type T.

Then I tried Key<Object>, Objectify was still unpleased, Objectify said Object is not a registered entity. Should I register Object!?!? and that kinda loses the whole point to a typed key that Objectify offers.

Is there a good solution. Thanks!

-- UPDATE 2 --

Since someone pointed out Key.create(myEntity) I should point my full use ...

/**********************************************************************************************************************
 * Constructors END & Identification and Relationship Methods BEGIN
 **********************************************************************************************************************/

    @ApiSerializationProperty(name = "id")
    public String getWebSafeKey() {

        String webSafeKey = getKey().getString();

        return webSafeKey;

    }

    public void setWebSafeKey(String webSafeKey) throws BadRequestException {

        try {
            Key<MyEntity> key = Key.create(webSafeKey);
            setKey(key);

        } catch (IllegalArgumentException illegalArgumentException) {
            throw new BadRequestException(ErrorMessage.INVALID_ID);
        }

    }

    @ApiSerializationProperty(name = "parentId")
    public String getParentWebSafeKey() {
        String webSafeKey = parent.getString();
        return webSafeKey;
    }

    public void setParentWebSafeKey(String parentWebSafeKey) throws BadRequestException {

        if (id == null) {
            try {
                parent = Key.create(parentWebSafeKey);
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException illegalArgumentException) {
                throw new BadRequestException(ErrorMessage.invalidParentId("Property"));
            }

        } else {
            /* Do nothing. Only set parent here if setWebSafeKey is never called, such as during a create. */
        }

    }

    @ApiSerializationProperty(ignored = AnnotationBoolean.TRUE)
    public Key<MyEntity> getParentKey() {
        return parent;
    }

    public void setParentKey(Key<MyEntity> parentKey) {
        this.parent = parentKey;
    }

    @ApiSerializationProperty(ignored = AnnotationBoolean.TRUE)
    public Key<MyEntity> getKey() {

        Key<MyEntity> key = Key.create(parent, MyEntity.class, id);

        return key;

    }

    public void setKey(Key<MyEntity> key) {
        id = key.getId();
        parent = key.getParent();
    }

    public boolean webSafeKeyEquals(String webSafeKey) {

        boolean equals;

        if (id !=null & parent !=null) {
            equals = getWebSafeKey().equals(webSafeKey);
        } else {
            equals = false;
        }

        return equals;

    }

/**********************************************************************************************************************
 * Identification Methods END & Other Getters and Setters BEGIN
 **********************************************************************************************************************/

All this has to be inserted for every entity I create with MyEntity replaced for the actual entity name. It's not just typing. This code doesn't belong in the entity class, but rather in some abstract parent. If I could have only code unique to a particular entity in the class, my model would be cleaner, and easier to expand. Thanks again.

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1  
I don't understand the question. Can you explain a bit more? –  Rohit Jain Oct 27 '13 at 7:23
5  
What's the problem with List<AnyObject>? –  JB Nizet Oct 27 '13 at 7:23
    
What I mean to say is, you can't run code in the <> braces. So how do I use reflection to get the type of the instance the deceleration of List<this.type> runs in. –  Marc M. Oct 27 '13 at 7:26
    
There is an end goal to this. Eventual I want to have this class be extended and create a list of the type of its polymorphic instance. Is this all even possible? –  Marc M. Oct 27 '13 at 7:28
3  
@Marc.4D Why would you want to do that? A List of superclass can already hold any instance of it's subclass. –  Rohit Jain Oct 27 '13 at 7:32

5 Answers 5

This would not make sense. Consider: you would never know what the type of list is. Suppose that list is used in some method of some class, it could always be that this is an instance of a subclass. So the parameter of List in the type of list can never be assumed in any code. If it can never be known, then what is the point of it? You would just use List<?>.

Generics is a purely compile-time thing. Therefore, it is meaningless to depend on the runtime class of something.

I suggest that you have

public class AnyObject<T> {
    List<T> list;
}

and any class Foo which wants to have list be a List<Foo>, for example, should just implement or inherit from AnyObject<Foo>.

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This does not make sense List<this.getClass()> list; as the type parameters are compile time thing in java. This information is erased at runtime.

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Without being familiar with Objectify, just generics, the thing I see is that Key.create is supposed to itself take a generic argument <T> for the type of returned Key. So you would be supposed to do the following when you call the method in the superclass:

Key<Y> key = Key.<Y>create(this.parentKey, this.getClass(), this.id);

You may only simply have to do that to fix the error (and should be doing it anyway). Otherwise Key.create will try to instantiate a new Key<Y> and although it is more or less valid to not declare a type argument when a method asks for one, apparently Key.create may not like that.

I think you should also take another look at your Ts and Ys because it appears you are mixing them. Right now you are handing Key.create a Key<T> as a parameter but wanting to return a Key<Y>. Also if you declare your class as having <T, Y> it should be illegal to extend it with only <MyEntityParent>.

Looking at your code I think what you are trying to do is create Key of the same class as the method you are calling it from. IE class generateKey in MyEntity should return a Key<MyEntity>. I think the proper way to do this would be like so (which is valid):

public abstract class MyProjectEntity<T, K> {
    Long id;
    Key<K> parentKey;

    public Key<K> generateKey() {
        return Key.<K>create(parentKey, this.getClass(), id);
    }
}

public class MyEntity extends MyEntityParent<MyEntityParent, MyEntity> {
    /*
     * K is now MyEntity and parentKey is a Key<MyEntity>
     * generateKey now does the following:
     *
     * public Key<MyEntity> generateKey() {
     *     return Key.<MyEntity>create(parentKey, MyEntity.class, id);
     * }
     *
     */
}

It just seems like your example that doesn't work is giving the error because you aren't declaring the types properly. But it is hard to tell because it is unclear what your T and Y are supposed to be. You only show one of the types being declared and at least in your generateKey method you are handing Key.create a Key<T> but wanting to return a Key<Y>.

Or perhaps you should take a look at Registering Entities in the Objectify API. IE it seems you might be supposed to do something like this and that is a possible reason you are getting the error:

static {
    ObjectifyService.register(MyEntityParent.class);
}

But anyway in the world of Java generics you really ought to be able to do something like this without any gymnastics unless something else is going on. The nature of erasure is that you can't find out the type at runtime but the type is essentially "known" because all instances of T are replaced with the argument type.

public abstract class MyProjectEntity<T> {
    Key<T> parentKey;
}

becomes

public class MyEntity extends MyProjectEntity<MyEntityParent> {
    Key<MyEntityParent> parentKey;
}

You can't find out whether or not parentKey is of Type <MyEntityParent> but it is of that type. You can obviously see this with something like a java.util.List where if you do the following:

List<Double> doubleList = new ArrayList<Double>(0);
doubleList.add("a string");

You will get the following if you ignore the compiler errors and try to run the program anyway:

Uncompilable source code - Erroneous sym type: java.util.ArrayList.add
java.lang.RuntimeException: Uncompilable source code - Erroneous sym type: java.util.ArrayList.add

Because the list does "only hold" instances of Double. This situation could be compared to an anonymous class where that instance of an ArrayList's add method now officially takes a Double as an argument. It is uncompilable because I just tried to do this:

public void add(Double element) {
    // add the element to the array
}

list.add("a string");

Which is obviously illegal. This ArrayList's underlying array is still an Object[] but the methods will be changed to reflect the type and safely make sure the array only holds Double elements at runtime.

So I would recommend taking a look at the things I mentioned because it appears that there's more than one problem unless you've omitted relevant code.

share|improve this answer
    
Your, right the example code is kinda sloppy, and has errors. I couldn't exactly post my real code, not all of the project is open source. I did however use generics correctly in the real code. The major problem is Objectify says T is an invalid argument for key.create(), and of course you can't register T. Also registering the parent entity is possible using polymorphism at the database level, but I didn't want to do that. I just wanted the benefits of sharing code, but not the complexity of having polymorphic entities in the data base. Seems like this is more or less a no go. –  Marc M. Nov 5 '13 at 19:39
1  
Try declaring the T argument of Key.create: Key<T> = Key.<T>create(parentKey, this.getClass(), id);. This is valid generic code assuming T is MyEntity because this method call now looks like Key<MyEntity> = Key.<MyEntity>create(parentKey, MyEntity.class, id); and parentKey is now a Key<MyEntity> as well. It might help to know what Y is. Otherwise my point is that doing something like this is perfectly valid. If it still doesn't work then there is relevant code you haven't shown. It seems like your generics are just mixed up and I can't tell how to fix it from what you have. –  Radiodef Nov 5 '13 at 20:02
    
Sounds, like something I want to try. I'll branch off and give it a whirl when I get a chance, and let you know how it works. Thanks a lot btws. –  Marc M. Nov 5 '13 at 20:07
1  
You should be declaring the type argument of the method anyway. It's perfectly valid to declare a type argument as a generic itself as long as the type you specify is then declared in the subclass. But otherwise you are calling the method without a type. –  Radiodef Nov 5 '13 at 20:08
    
I've updated my answer to reflect what I think you're trying to do. It is just unclear with your multiple types, sorry. –  Radiodef Nov 5 '13 at 22:11

I think I understand your problem and here is how you could do it. The trick is to pass the subclass as a generic parameter of the parent class:

class Parent<T> {
    T doStuff() {
        T res = null;
        // res = ..... this.getClass() is ok...
        return res;
    }
}

public class SelfGerenic extends Parent<SelfGerenic> {
}

public class OtherSubClass extends Parent<OtherSubClass> {
}
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If I got you right, you're looking for something like this:

public class Test {
private int id;

public Key<Test> getKey() {
    return createKey(id, this.getClass());
}

public static <T> Key<T> createKey(int id, Class<? extends T> clazz) {
    return new Key<T>(clazz, id);
}

private static class Key<T> {
    private final Class<? extends T> clazz;
    private final int id;

    private Key(Class<? extends T> clazz, int id) {
        this.clazz = clazz;
        this.id = id;
    }

    private int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    private Class<? extends T> getClazz() {
        return clazz;
    }
}

public int getId() {
    return id;
}
}

It is not possible to replace Test here: public Key<Test> getKey() {! This is because getKey() always returns Key. It can not return Test. So basically no, there is no way to change this behaviour. Also there is no way to get the generic type of the "current" class. This is some kind of limit of the java generics :P

You could remove the generics here, so you do not have to implement getKey() every time.

public class Test {
private int id;

public Key getKey() {
    return createKey(id, this.getClass());
}

public static  Key createKey(int id, Class clazz) {
    return new Key(clazz, id);
}

private static class Key {
    private final Class clazz;
    private final int id;

    private Key(Class clazz, int id) {
        this.clazz = clazz;
        this.id = id;
    }

    private int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    private Class getClazz() {
        return clazz;
    }
}

public int getId() {
    return id;
}
}
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