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My colleagues very often use word "application context". In many articles this collocation used very often too.

My current understanding: application context is single xml file.

But I understand that if I was right, people wouldn't use "application context" instead of configuration xml file.

Can you help me to deal with this issue?

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1  
Your Colleagues are right person to answer your question. Why not you ask them? –  Shamse Oct 27 '13 at 8:25
    
I have not oportunity to make it –  homeAccount Oct 27 '13 at 8:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@feak gives a straight answer about the meaning of ApplicationContext in terms of Spring. In short, it is the context that loads the configuration (usually a XML file) and then Spring will start managing the beans and its benefits:

  • Beans declared in package
  • Beans declared by annotations (if this configuration is enabled)
  • Bean and method autowiring
  • Bean injection
  • Configuration, .properties file loading
  • etc

To start an application context, you may use one of the following:

  • Manually load the application context at the beginning of your application. This is done for sample purposes or in standalone applications:

    public class Foo {
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            ApplicationContext context =
                new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("path/to/applicationContext.xml");
            //use the context as you wish...
        }
    }
    
  • In case of Java web applications using Spring MVC, the DispatchServlet will load the application context for you, so you only have to create a springapp-servlet.xml file in WEB-INF folder of the application.

Note that an application context is associated to a single configuration (XML based or not). Period.


After understanding this, you could also understand that you can have more than a single application context per application. This is, having two or more ApplicationContexts in the same application. From the last example in the console application, this is easy to check:

public class Foo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ApplicationContext context =
            new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("path/to/applicationContext.xml");
        ApplicationContext context2 =
            new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("path/to/applicationContext.xml");
        //use the context as you wish...
    }
}

Note that we have two application contexts using the same XML configuration. Can you do this? Yes, you're actually seeing it here. What's the difference, then? The main difference is that Spring beans singleton scopes are singleton per application context, this mean when retrieving a Bar bean that's configured in applicationContext.xml file from context will not be the same as retrieving it from context2, but several retrieves from context will return the same Bar bean instance.

Is this considered a good or bad practice? Neither, it will depend on the problem to be solved (in case of last example, I would say it is a bad practice). Most people would recommend having all your beans configured in a single place (via XML or another) and loaded by a single application context.

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Can you explain differences between single application context and single xml file –  homeAccount Oct 27 '13 at 8:40
    
@homeAccount what don't you understand? The XML file defines the configuration, the application context loads the configuration from this file and Spring start handling your defined beans. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 27 '13 at 8:42
    
One context can uses many xml files. How? I don't understand when I use many contexts and when I use single context –  homeAccount Oct 27 '13 at 8:46
    
How Can I understand to which context this xml concerns? –  homeAccount Oct 27 '13 at 8:48
    
@homeAccount answer updated. Hope it solves your concerns. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 27 '13 at 8:58

I guess that you colleagues meant the loaded spring application context, which allows access to:

  • configuration of application,
  • initialized beans,
  • application events api,
  • etc
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which differences between xml file and "application context" –  homeAccount Oct 27 '13 at 8:31
    
Application context and spring xml file it is different terms. One application context can be initialized using one, two and more xml files. Also, to initialization application context can be used /@Configuration classes without xml files. So, i want to say that xml and /@Configuration it's approach to configurate context. –  kemenov Oct 27 '13 at 8:49
    
ok. What does it mean when I hear "different contexts" ? –  homeAccount Oct 27 '13 at 8:52
    
The application can have several application contexts. Each context will have certain settings. there are tasks that require such an approach(several contexts). –  kemenov Oct 27 '13 at 8:59

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