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I was just going through pointers in C and I when I was creating various cases I stumbled upon this one: (IDE used - Code::Blocks

Compiler - GNU GCC)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int a=2;
    int *pa;
    pa=&a;

    printf("1 %u\n", &a );
    printf("2 %u\n", pa );
    printf("3 %d\n", a );

    printf("4 %u\n", &(pa));
    //printf("\n4 %u\n", &(*pa)); // output not as expected 

    printf("End \n");
    return 0;
}

Here the output is:

1 2686748

2 2686748

3 2

4 2686744

End

Now when I change the 4th printf to:

printf("\n4 %u\n", &(*pa)); 

The output changes to:

1 2686744

2 2686744

3 2

4 2686744

End

Here in the 2nd part the the *pa should have given 2 and &(*pa) should have given 2686748 but here the previous values have been altered!

Expected output should be (for &(*pa)): 2686748, 2686748, 2, 2686748

Please explain me why am I not getting the expected output and where my I going wrong??

I have purposely not used %p in printf() so please don't ask me to replace %u or %d with it.

Here is the link to IDEone if you want (a similar output is generated there also):

Program - here just remove/insert comments and you will understand, first include both the printf's then alternatively comment out 1 of them.

Ignore the inclusion of stdlib.h I was too lazy to remove it :P

Please keep it AS SIMPLE AS POSSIBLE :)

The assemblies:

First for:

     printf("4 %u\n", &(pa));

   // printf("\n4 %u\n", &(*pa)); 


0x00401334  push   %ebp

0x00401335  mov    %esp,%ebp

0x00401337  and    $0xfffffff0,%esp

0x0040133A  sub    $0x20,%esp

0x0040133D  call   0x401970 <__main>

0x00401342  movl   $0x2,0x1c(%esp)

0x0040134A  lea    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x0040134E  mov    %eax,0x18(%esp)

0x00401352  lea    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x00401356  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x0040135A  movl   $0x403024,(%esp)

0x00401361  call   0x401be8 <printf>

0x00401366  mov    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x0040136A  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x0040136E  movl   $0x40302a,(%esp)

0x00401375  call   0x401be8 <printf>

0x0040137A  mov    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x0040137E  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x00401382  movl   $0x403030,(%esp)

0x00401389  call   0x401be8 <printf>

**here>** 0x0040138E    lea    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x00401392  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x00401396  movl   $0x403036,(%esp)

0x0040139D  call   0x401be8 <printf>

0x004013A2  movl   $0x40303c,(%esp)

0x004013A9  call   0x401be0 <puts>

0x004013AE  mov    $0x0,%eax

0x004013B3  leave

0x004013B4  ret



Second for :

   // printf("4 %u\n", &(pa));

    printf("\n4 %u\n", &(*pa));



0x00401334  push   %ebp

0x00401335  mov    %esp,%ebp

0x00401337  and    $0xfffffff0,%esp

0x0040133A  sub    $0x20,%esp

0x0040133D  call   0x401970 <__main>

0x00401342  movl   $0x2,0x18(%esp)

0x0040134A  lea    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x0040134E  mov    %eax,0x1c(%esp)

0x00401352  lea    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x00401356  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x0040135A  movl   $0x403024,(%esp)

0x00401361  call   0x401be8 <printf>

0x00401366  mov    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x0040136A  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x0040136E  movl   $0x40302a,(%esp)

0x00401375  call   0x401be8 <printf>

0x0040137A  mov    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x0040137E  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x00401382  movl   $0x403030,(%esp)

0x00401389  call   0x401be8 <printf>

**here>** 0x0040138E    mov    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x00401392  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x00401396  movl   $0x403036,(%esp)

0x0040139D  call   0x401be8 <printf>

0x004013A2  movl   $0x40303d,(%esp)

0x004013A9  call   0x401be0 <puts>

0x004013AE  mov    $0x0,%eax

0x004013B3  leave

0x004013B4  ret


Third one for:

    printf("4 %u\n", &(pa));

    printf("\n4 %u\n", &(*pa));


0x00401334  push   %ebp

0x00401335  mov    %esp,%ebp

0x00401337  and    $0xfffffff0,%esp

0x0040133A  sub    $0x20,%esp

0x0040133D  call   0x401980 <__main>

0x00401342  movl   $0x2,0x1c(%esp)

0x0040134A  lea    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x0040134E  mov    %eax,0x18(%esp)

0x00401352  lea    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x00401356  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x0040135A  movl   $0x403024,(%esp)

0x00401361  call   0x401bf8 <printf>

0x00401366  mov    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x0040136A  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x0040136E  movl   $0x40302a,(%esp)

0x00401375  call   0x401bf8 <printf>

0x0040137A  mov    0x1c(%esp),%eax

0x0040137E  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x00401382  movl   $0x403030,(%esp)

0x00401389  call   0x401bf8 <printf>

0x0040138E  lea    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x00401392  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x00401396  movl   $0x403036,(%esp)

0x0040139D  call   0x401bf8 <printf>

**here>** 0x004013A2    mov    0x18(%esp),%eax

0x004013A6  mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)

0x004013AA  movl   $0x40303c,(%esp)

0x004013B1  call   0x401bf8 <printf>

0x004013B6  movl   $0x403043,(%esp)

0x004013BD  call   0x401bf0 <puts>

0x004013C2  mov    $0x0,%eax

0x004013C7  leave

0x004013C8  ret
share|improve this question
2  
Simple is &(*pa) == &*pa = pa – Grijesh Chauhan Oct 27 '13 at 8:38
    
"I have purposely not used %p in printf() so please don't ask me to replace %u or %d with it." It would be more standard conforming, but it would make no difference on the absolute values. Ths observation would be the same. – glglgl Oct 27 '13 at 9:02

It's probably a optimization of the compiler

If you do not use &pa, all usages of pa are equivalent to &a.

So the compiler removes the pa variable altogether, and it is not using space anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
That was not the question. – Sadiq Oct 27 '13 at 8:41
1  
And so the compiler doesn't allocate space for pa, and the address a gets changes. The compiler gets to allocate variables pretty much where it likes. – Alan Stokes Oct 27 '13 at 8:43
3  
No, it was the question. Because pa gets removed, the stack bin pa used is free, and a is stored in the bin pa used to be stored in. This explains why &a in the 2nd run is the same as &pa in the first – BeniBela Oct 27 '13 at 8:46
    
You explained OP's particular case. But addresses are not guaranteed to be the same every run. Just test this: ideone.com/eMJYKk. Your answer is not relevant there. – kotlomoy Oct 27 '13 at 8:55
    
@kotlomoy it's not guaranteed to be the same but it depends on whether the platform does address randomization. The OP seems to match benibela's guess – tristan Oct 27 '13 at 12:08

Here in the 2nd part the the *pa should have given 2 and &(*pa) should have given 2686748 but here the previous values have been altered!

Who told you that every time you run a program you will get the same exact memory location in every run? Also use %p for printing addresses.

The stack area traditionally adjoined the heap area and grew the opposite direction; when the stack pointer meets the heap pointer, free memory was exhausted. (With modern large address spaces and virtual memory techniques they may be placed almost anywhere, but they still typically grow opposite directions.)

The stack area contains the program stack, a LIFO structure, typically located in the higher parts of memory. On the standard PC x86 computer architecture it grows toward address zero; on some other architectures it grows the opposite direction. A “stack pointer” register tracks the top of the stack; it is adjusted each time a value is “pushed” onto the stack.

Stack, where automatic variables are stored, along with information that is saved each time a function is called. Each time a function is called, the address of where to return to and certain information about the caller’s environment, such as some of the machine registers, are saved on the stack. The newly called function then allocates room on the stack for its automatic and temporary variables.

So the point is variable can be allocated anywhere, depending on each run.

Image

share|improve this answer
    
No, programs are deterministic. You get the same addresses in every run (unless you are using the heap) – BeniBela Oct 27 '13 at 8:47
    
@BeniBela That is - in this case - not right. For preventing buffer overflow injections, especially the adresses on the stack are subject to change. – glglgl Oct 27 '13 at 8:57
    
I have never seen a platform that does randomization on the addresses of the main module or the main function. They usually only randomize dynamically linked modules. (and you would explicitily need to set -fPIC when compiling it) – BeniBela Oct 27 '13 at 12:46
1  
Nothing guarantees that addresses are stable. Assuming that means relying on implementation details. This answer is correct. – usr Oct 27 '13 at 14:09
    
BeniBela is correct here, you could run this a hundred time on a local system and will get the same memory address. Just try this program again while alternatively commenting out the last two printf's and then run both the printf's together, you will understand, I am still looking for an exact explanation – Am33d Oct 28 '13 at 6:20

I explain the single steps below:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int a=2;
    int *pa;
    pa=&a; // (1)

    printf("1  %u\n", &a ); // outputs the address of a
    printf("2  %u\n", pa ); // outputs the address of a as well due to (1)
    printf("3  %d\n", a ); // outputs the value of a

    printf("4  %u\n", &(pa)); // outputs the value of the pointer variable pa
    printf("4a %u\n", &(*pa)); // Outputs the address of the mempry pa points to, so it is esssentially pa. Output as expected!

    printf("End\n");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess you have a typo in this line "outputs the value of the pointer variable pa". It should be address. – Arpit Oct 27 '13 at 9:57

The first program takes the address of pa, but the second does not. When you do not take the address of an object, the C implementation is not required to reserve actual memory space for it, and optimization may avoid putting it in memory. The object might exist only in a register or even be completely eliminated by additional optimizations.

Thus, whether an address is taken (and printed, which forces it to be observable outside the program) changes what memory the implementation must use. This results in a different arrangement of things in memory, which results in different addresses.

(Of course, no guarantees about these addresses are made to you. The implementation is free to arrange these objects in a a variety of ways, as it chooses.)

share|improve this answer

&a will print the pointer address to a

pa will also print the pointer address to a, because the value of pa is an address (*pa is the dereferenced value)

a should print 2, for obvious reasons

&(pa) will print the address pa

&(*pa) is the address of the dereferenced pa (address of a)

pa             &(pa)           *(&pa)         *pa           a             &a
(a's address)  (pa's address)  (address of a) (value of a)  (value of a)  (address of a)

so basically, that is expected behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
s/the pointer to pa/the address of pa/. – glglgl Oct 27 '13 at 9:01
    
fixed.......... – Marco Scannadinari Oct 27 '13 at 9:44

Expected output should be (for &(*pa)): 2686748, 2686748, 2, 2686748

Please explain me why am I not getting the expected output and where my I going wrong??

From OP I'd assume your result is reproducible so you got the exact same output when you run it multiple times. right? So your OS doesn't do address (at least stack) randomization.

I'd agree with BeniBela's theory that it's due to compiler optimization. In your second program, local variable pa is optimized out. It's equivalent to this:

int main()
{
    int a=2;

    printf("1 %u\n", &a );
    printf("2 %u\n", &a );
    printf("3 %d\n", a );    
    printf("\n4 %u\n", &(a)); // output not as expected 

    printf("End \n");
    return 0;
}

So the stack frame layouts of your first and second programs would be different. But the size of the function frame may not change as gcc by default has the stack 16-byte aligned.

Update: from the disassembly, the stack frame is like:

The first one

           +-------+
0x0028FF00 |       |  <== (%esp)
           +-------+
0x0028FF04 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF08 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF0c |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF10 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF14 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF18 |       |  <== pa
           +-------+
0x0028FF1c |   2   |  <== a
           +-------+
0x0028FF20 |       |
           +-------+

then second:

           +-------+
0x0028FF00 |       |  <== (%esp)
           +-------+
0x0028FF04 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF08 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF0c |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF10 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF14 |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF18 |   2   |  <== a
           +-------+
0x0028FF1c |       |
           +-------+
0x0028FF20 |       |
share|improve this answer
    
how to post the assembly? I mean the steps for doing that in Code::Blocks? – Am33d Oct 28 '13 at 6:00
    
    
I have posted the assemblies of different test cases – Am33d Oct 28 '13 at 7:46
    
Thanks for the link – Am33d Oct 28 '13 at 7:47

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