Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm having problems supporting python2 and python3 on a type() call. This demonstrates the problem:

from __future__ import unicode_literals

name='FooClass'
type(name, (dict,), {})

No problem on python3, but on python2:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 6, in <module>
    type(name, (dict,), {})
TypeError: type() argument 1 must be string, not unicode

This is related to Any gotchas using unicode_literals in Python 2.6?. In that question, someone recommends typecasting to a bytestring, so naively I thought about using six.b():

A “fake” bytes literal. data should always be a normal string literal. In Python 2, b() returns a 8-bit string. In Python 3, data is encoded with the latin-1 encoding to bytes.

So it looks like this:

from __future__ import unicode_literals
import six

name='FooClass'
type(six.b(name), (dict,), {})

But it fails on both python2 and python3:

$ python2 test.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 6, in <module>
    type(six.b(name), (dict,), {})
TypeError: type() argument 1 must be string, not unicode

$ python3 test.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 6, in <module>
    type(six.b(name), (dict,), {})
TypeError: type() argument 1 must be str, not bytes

So it seems that really, type() wants a python2 str which is a python3 bytestring on python2, but it wants a python3 str which is a python2 unicode string on python3.

What do you think ?

Is there something I don't understand ?

Or is there a real incompatibility with type() on python 2 and 3 ?

Isn't there any way to have the same type() call supporting both 2 and 3 ?

Shouldn't a tool like six provide a wrapper around type() in that case ?

share|improve this question
    
type(str(name)? – georg Oct 27 '13 at 12:35
    
Thanks, that works, I was sure I had tested it though ... – jpic Oct 27 '13 at 12:39
up vote 11 down vote accepted

six.b is written under the assumption that you won't use unicode_literals (and that you'll pass a string literal to it, as the documentation states), so the Python 2 implementation is just def b(s): return s as a Python 2 string literal is already a byte string.

Either don't use unicode_literals in this module, or use (as a comment suggests) str(name). In Python 3, that is a no-op. In Python 2, it silently converts the unicode string to a byte string (assuming some encoding that I can't be bothered to remember, but it's a superset of ASCII so you should be fine).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.